Table 1

Demographic and social characteristics of First Nations adults (total N=554)

CharacteristicPrevalence % (95% CI)
Sex
 Male59.9 (53.3 to 67.2)
Age
 18–3440.2 (33.3 to 48)
 35–4935.4 (28.7 to 41.6)
 50+24.4 (18.4 to 30.8)
Education
 Some high school or less57.3 (51.1 to 64)
 Completed high school19.5 (14.5 to 24.7)
 Some or completed college18.3 (13.3 to 23.3)
 Some or completed University5 (2.4 to 8)
Income sources for household
 Provincial or municipal social assistance or welfare (eg, Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP), Ontario Works)69.2 (63.1 to 75)
 Wages and salaries28.2 (22.1 to 34.2)
 Child tax benefit17 (12.4 to 21.8)
 Any other income support13.3 (9.2 to 17.6)
 Employment insurance9.6 (5.4 to 14.3)
 Income from self-employment7.7 (4.3 to 11.7)
 Child support payments3 (1.1 to 4.6)
Individual annual income
 $0–499918.3 (13.4 to 24.8)
 $5000–599923.1 (17.1 to 28.5)
 $10 000–14 99921.9 (16.3 to 27.6)
 $15 000–19 99914.8 (10.7 to 20)
 $20 000+21.8 (16 to 27.6)
Mobility (moves in past 5 years)
 No10.2 (6.2 to 14.8)
 115.5 (10.5 to 20.6)
 220.2 (15.4 to 26.4)
 3–541.1 (35 to 48.6)
 6–1010.4 (5.7 to 13.4)
Overcrowding (persons/room)*
 ≤127.7 (21.6 to 33.8)
 1–246 (40.5 to 54.3)
 >226.3 (19.7 to 30.8)
Food security
 You and others always had enough of the kinds of food you wanted to eat26.7 (21.1 to 32.8)
 You and others had enough to eat, but not always the kinds of food you wanted51.5 (45.3 to 58)
 Sometimes or often you did not have enough to eat†21.8 (16.5 to 27)
  • *Following statistics Canada standards: calculated by dividing the number of rooms in each household (excluding the bathroom) by the number of people residing in the home, where a higher value of ‘persons per room’ indicates a higher level of crowding.40

  • †Collapsed sometimes and often you did not have enough food to eat.