Table 2

Association between sleep duration and weight outcomes, Thai Cohort Study 2009

Sleep durationOverall, N=60 569Weight outcomes*
Underweight versus normalOverweight versus normalObese versus normal
n (%)AOR (95% CI)AOR (95% CI)AOR (95% CI)
Sleep duration (men)
 <6 h4070 (14.9)1.16 (0.90 to 1.50)1.13 (1.00 to 1.28)1.36 (1.21 to 1.52)
 6 h4815 (17.6)0.90 (0.71 to 1.16)0.98 (0.88 to 1.09)1.16 (1.04 to 1.29)
 7 h5719 (20.9)RefRefRef
 8 h8664 (31.6)1.15 (0.94 to 1.42)1.06 (0.97 to 1.17)1.08 (0.99 to 1.19)
 ≥9 h4139 (15.1)1.08 (0.84 to 1.39)1.03 (0.91 to 1.16)1.16 (1.03 to 1.30)
Sleep duration (women)
 <6 h4728 (14.3)0.97 (0.85 to 1.11)1.33 (1.18 to 1.51)1.49 (1.32 to 1.68)
 6 h5120 (15.4)0.99 (0.87 to 1.12)1.21 (1.07 to 1.37)1.28 (1.14 to 1.44)
 7 h6965 (21.0)RefRefRef
 8 h11 007 (33.2)1.05 (0.95 to 1.16)1.13 (1.02 to 1.25)1.14 (1.04 to 1.26)
 ≥9 h5342 (16.1)1.21 (1.07 to 1.37)1.22 (1.07 to 1.39)1.36 (1.20 to 1.53)
  • * Body mass index (BMI) categories: normal = 18.5 to <23; underweight = ≤18.5; overweight-at-risk = 23 to <25; obese = ≥25. For each ‘abnormal’ category, multinomial logistic regression compares the outcome odds to the outcome odds of a ‘normal’ BMI, with the results expressed as an Odd Ratio (OR).

  • Adjusted ORs—covariates included age, marital status, personal income, geographical rural–urban residence, physical activity, fruit and vegetable intakes, screen time, smoking, alcohol drinking, doctor-diagnosed depression and chronic health conditions (see the Methods section).

  • Bolded values indicate statistical significance at p<0.05.