Table 1

Demographics of patients included in study

AllNo deliriumDeliriumP value
Age (mean, SD)80.3 (8.2)79.6 (8.2)82.9 (8.1)<0.001
Gender (% female)53.8% (337)54.9% (271)50.0% (66)0.320
Dementia (known/probable %)20.2% (126)14.4% (71)41.7% (55)<0.001
Clinical frailty scale
 1–329.6% (185)34.9% (172)9.8% (13)<0.001
 4–653.0% (331)52.1% (257)56.1% (74)
 7–917.4% (109)13.0% (64)34.1% (45)
Specialty
 Acute medicine19.5% (122)19.0% (94)21.2% (28)<0.001
 Geriatric medicine25.7% (161)20.4% (101)45.5% (60)
 Stroke4.3% (27)5.3% (26)0.8% (1)
 Other medicine27.5% (172)29.1% (144)21.2% (28)
 Other surgery6.7% (42)8.3% (41)0.8% (1)
 General surgery7.7% (48)8.5% (42)4.5% (6)
 Orthopaedic surgery8.6% (54)9.3% (46)6.1% (8)
  • Patients with delirium were older, more likely to have dementia, and more likely to be frail compared with those without delirium. The prevalence of delirium in patients admitted other surgical specialties other than general or orthopaedic was lower than across other specialties.