Table 4

Reasons cited by physicians for changing therapy in patients receiving metformin (as monotherapy or as part of a combination treatment) as a first-line therapy, for patients receiving a second-line therapy with or without metformin

Reason for changing from first-line therapy at baselinePatients who went on to receive second-line therapy with MET n=10 055 (84.9)Patients who went on to receive second-line therapy without MET n=1782 (15.1)Overall
n=
11 837
Lack of efficacy8928 (91.5)1257 (72.7)10 185 (88.7)
Hypoglycaemia156 (1.6)21 (1.2)177 (1.5)
Weight gain628 (6.4)56 (3.2)684 (6.0)
Adverse effects331 (3.4)291 (16.8)622 (5.4)
Developed acute disease41 (0.4)27 (1.6)68 (0.6)
Developed chronic disease27 (0.3)81 (4.7)108 (0.9)
Affordability98 (1.0)4 (0.2)102 (0.9)
Inability to self-administer13 (0.1)2 (0.1)15 (0.1)
Patient request127 (1.3)61 (3.5)188 (1.6)
Poor adherence182 (1.9)40 (2.3)222 (1.9)
Patient convenience164 (1.7)30 (1.7)194 (1.7)
Prescriber access65 (0.7)4 (0.2)69 (0.6)
Drug interaction3 (<0.1)8 (0.5)11 (0.1)
Physician preference620 (6.4)113 (6.5)733 (6.4)
Missing30054354
  • Data are reported as n (%). Several reasons could be selected for each patient. Percentages were calculated for all patients with data available; patients with missing data were excluded. Overall, data were available for 11 483 patients (9755 and 1728 patients who received second-line therapy with and without MET, respectively, after exclusion of missing data).

  • MET, metformin.