Table 5

Top 10 findings by prevalence and summary quality scores (SQS)

FindingSQS
MedianRangeStudies (n)
1. Fostering relationships with people both inside and outside of prison is important to prisoners with palliative and end of life care needs2 3 29–33 36 40 41 45 85%57%–98%11
2. Inmate hospice volunteers are able to build and maintain close relationships with the prisoners they care for29–33 36 41 88%80%–98%7
3. The conflicting priorities of care and custody can have a negative impact on the delivery of palliative and end of life care in prisons2 29 30 35 37 39 45 68%55%–85%7
4. Maintaining family relationships is important to prisoners at the end of life2 3 33 36 40 41 87%63%–98%6
5. Nursing in prison requires a set of skills unique to the custodial environment2 4 29 32 35 36 79%55%–95%6
6. The physical environment of the prison can present a barrier to the delivery of palliative and end of life care2–4 34 36 45 78%50%–90%6
7. Inmate hospice volunteers experience grief as a result of their role30–32 39 42 85%80%–95%5
8. Recognition of a shared humanity between individuals can encourage better attitudes to palliative and end of life care delivery in prison, across disciplines29 30 33 34 38 83%78%–98%5
9. Prisoners who may die in prison have a strong desire to either survive their sentence, or to be released early on compassionate grounds3 4 34 40 41 83%73%–90%5
10. Prisoners have poorer health than the general population4 8 9 44 46 80%38%–95%5