Table 2

ORs of alcohol use disorders in relation to intelligence test score and parental psychiatric history, in the full sample of 3287 Danish men and in stratified analyses*

Model 1†
OR (95% CI)
Model 2‡
OR (95% CI)
Model 3§
OR (95% CI)
Full sample (n=3287)
 Intelligence test (per SD decrease)1.93 (1.73 to 2.16)1.89 (1.68 to 2.11)1.69 (1.49 to 1.92)
 Parental alcohol use disorders
  No111
  Yes1.92 (1.40 to 2.65)1.24 (0.86 to 1.78)1.16 (0.80 to 1.69)
 Parental psychiatric disorders
  No111
  Yes1.88 (1.47 to 2.39)1.59 (1.19 to 2.07)1.52 (1.15 to 2.01)
Men with psychiatric disorders (n=592)
 Intelligence test (per SD decrease)1.26 (1.06 to 1.48)1.25 (1.06 to 1.48)1.21 (1.01 to 1.46)
 Parental alcohol use disorders
  No111
  Yes1.40 (0.87 to 2.25)1.35 (0.80 to 2.27)1.36 (0.80 to 2.31)
 Parental psychiatric disorders
  No111
  Yes1.24 (0.86 to 1.79)1.08 (0.72 to 1.62)1.06 (0.71 to 1.60)
Men without psychiatric disorders (n=2695)
 Intelligence test (per SD decrease)2.27 (1.90 to 2.71)2.24 (1.87 to 2.68)2.04 (1.67 to 2.49)
 Parental alcohol use disorders
  No111
  Yes1.61 (0.93 to 2.77)0.85 (0.45 to 1.60)0.76 (0.40 to 1.45)
 Parental psychiatric disorders
  No111
  Yes1.90 (1.29 to 2.80)1.70 (1.10 to 2.64)1.66 (1.06 to 2.58)
  • *The interaction between intelligence and other psychiatric disorders with respect to risk of alcohol use disorders was statistically significant (p value for interaction <0.001).

  • †Model 1 was unadjusted.

  • ‡Model 2 included intelligence, parental alcohol use disorders and parental psychiatric disorders.

  • §Model 3 included intelligence, parental alcohol use disorders, parental psychiatric disorders, maternal smoking during pregnancy, birth weight, maternal age at birth, parity and childhood socioeconomic position.