Table 3

Experiences, importance of and satisfaction with learning techniques on health planning, and management among district heath managers

Learning methodImportance of learning techniques*Having experience in learning methods†Satisfaction with learning techniques
Number (%)
Mean (SD)Number (%)Very HighHighModerateLow
Learning by practice18.37 (2.1)59 (81.9)29 (41.4)33 (47.1)8 (11.4)
Working with experienced persons13.12 (4.9)53 (73.6)26 (37.7)37 (53.6)5 (7.2)1 (1.4)
Access to publications17.27 (2.7)49 (68.1)8 (12.5)33 (51.6)20 (31.3)3 (4.7)
Practice or being involved in research14.75 (3.7)33 (45.8)7 (12.5)18 (32.1)26 (46.4)5 (8.9)
On-line learning13.07 (4.6)28 (38.9)5 (9.4)17 (32.1)23 (43.4)8 (15.1)
Study tours15.53 (3.4)19 (26.4)9 (22.0)12 (29.3)8 (19.5)12 (29.3)
Formal certified training12.90 (5.3)47 (65.3)9 (15.0)29 (48.3)16 (26.7)6 (10.0)
Attending workshops, meetings and conferences14.99 (3.9)51 (70.8)16 (24.2)32 (48.5)17 (25.8)1 (1.5)
Working with colleagues who shared training10.72 (5.5)46 (63.9)17 (27.4)34 (54.8)9 (14.5)2 (3.2)
Discussions with colleagues12.72 (4.8)52 (72.2)19 (27.9)35 (51.5)13 (19.1)1 (1.5)
Networks12.68 (6.1)39 (54.2)8 (13.5)23 (39.0)23 (39.0)5 (8.5)
Twinning of organisations12.78 (4.7)35 (48.6)8 (13.8)20 (34.5)23 (39.7)7 (12.1)
  • *The importance of each method was rated on a 0–20 scale.

  • †Number of participants who have declared having experience in that learning method.