Table 2

Attitudes regarding healthy lifestyle counselling and cancer prevention among practitioners in primary healthcare clinics in Jordan

StatementNon-physiciansPhysicians
Proportion disagreeing/neutral that ‘preventing cancer is possible’ (n=320)*72 (33.3%)23 (22.6%)
Proportion agreeing/neutral that ‘most patients aware of smoking–cancer relation, do not need more information’ (n=314)129 (60.9%)65 (65.0%)
Proportion agreeing/neutral that ‘most patients aware of diet–cancer relation, do not need more information’ (n=318)92 (43.2%)37 (35.9%)
Proportion agreeing/neutral that ‘most patients aware of exercise–cancer relation, do not need more information’ (n=316)84 (39.8%)36 (35.0%)
Proportion disagreeing/neutral that ‘smoking is a medical condition needing treatment’ (n=316)36 (16.8%)18 (18.0%)
Proportion disagreeing/neutral that ‘obesity is a medical condition needing treatment’ (n=317)19 (9.0%)6 (5.8%)
Proportion disagreeing/neutral that they are ‘bothered when seeing effects of unhealthy lifestyles on patients’ (n=310)35 (16.8%)14 (14.0%)
Proportion disagreeing/neutral that ‘likelihood that patient quits smoking increases if I advise him/her to do so’ (n=314)90 (42.7%)53 (52.5%)
Proportion disagreeing/neutral that ‘likelihood that patient follows healthy diet increases if I advise him/her to do so’ (n=311)66 (31.4%)28 (28.3%)
Proportion disagreeing/neutral that ‘likelihood that patient exercises increases if I advise him/her to do so’ (n=313)77 (37.0%)39 (37.9%)
Proportion agreeing/neutral that ‘counselling on prevention of non-communicable diseases (like diabetes and hypertensions) is more important than counselling on prevention of cancer’ (n=318)131 (60.7%)65 (65.0%)
Proportion disagreeing/neutral that ‘physicians in clinic should be trained to provide counselling on healthy lifestyle practices’ (n=317)22 (10.3%)16 (15.7%)
Proportion disagreeing/neutral that ‘non-physicians staff in the clinic should be trained to provide counselling on healthy lifestyle practices’ (n=321)24 (11.1%)9 (8.7%)
Proportion agreeing/neutral that ‘most patients won't take advice with regard to healthy lifestyle practices seriously’ (n=311)151 (72.3%)66 (66.0%)
Proportion disagreeing/neutral that they ‘feel more confident counselling patients on healthy lifestyle practices they successfully engage in themselves’ (n=321)29 (13.5%)8 (7.7%)
Proportion agreeing/neutral that they ‘prefer counselling only patients who they feel will listen to them on healthy lifestyle practices’ (n=320)130 (60.5%)59 (57.3%)
Proportion disagreeing/neutral that ‘counselling patients on healthy lifestyle practices gives a feeling of self-respect and self-satisfaction’ (n=322)33 (15.2%)11 (10.7%)
Proportion agreeing/neutral that ‘talking about healthy lifestyle practices bothers patients and negatively impacts relationship with them’ (n=311)84 (40.2%)42 (42.0%)
Proportion agreeing/neutral that ‘they feel uncomfortable talking about healthy lifestyle practices with patients’ (n=318)81 (37.9%)35 (34.3%)
Proportion disagreeing/neutral that ‘patients will change their lifestyle practices for the better if counselled on healthy lifestyle practices’ (n=316)48 (22.8%)29 (28.2%)
Proportion disagreeing/neutral that their ‘counselling on healthy lifestyle practices will lower patients’ risk of cancer’ (n=322)72 (33.3%)30 (28.9%)
Proportion disagreeing/neutral that their ‘counselling on healthy lifestyles will improve patient care’ (n=319)*34 (15.7%)7 (6.9%)
Proportion disagreeing/neutral that ‘counselling on healthy lifestyles should be physician's role’ (n=322)*95 (44.2%)62 (59.6%)
Proportion disagreeing/neutral that ‘counselling on healthy lifestyles should be nurse's role’ (n=321)*84 (38.9%)26 (25.0%)
  • *Significant χ2 statistic when comparing physicians to non-physicians (p<0.05).