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Factors influencing return to work after stroke: the Korean Stroke Cohort for Functioning and Rehabilitation (KOSCO) Study
  1. Junhee Han1,
  2. Hae In Lee2,
  3. Yong-Il Shin2,3,
  4. Ju Hyun Son2,
  5. Soo-Yeon Kim2,
  6. Deog Young Kim4,
  7. Min Kyun Sohn5,
  8. Jongmin Lee6,
  9. Sam-Gyu Lee7,
  10. Gyung-Jae Oh8,
  11. Yang-Soo Lee9,
  12. Min Cheol Joo10,
  13. Eun Young Han11,
  14. Won Hyuk Chang12,
  15. Yun-Hee Kim12,13
  1. 1 Department of Statistics and Institute of Statistics, Hallym University, Chuncheon, The Republic of Korea
  2. 2 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, The Republic of Korea
  3. 3 Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, The Republic of Korea
  4. 4 Department and Research Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, The Republic of Korea
  5. 5 School of Medicine, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, The Republic of Korea
  6. 6 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, The Republic of Korea
  7. 7 Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, The Republic of Korea
  8. 8 Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan, The Republic of Korea
  9. 9 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, The Republic of Korea
  10. 10 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, School of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan, The Republic of Korea
  11. 11 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, School of Medicine, Jeju National University, Jeju, The Republic of Korea
  12. 12 Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Center for Prevention and Rehabilitation, Heart Vascular and Stroke Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, The Republic of Korea
  13. 13 Department of Health Sciences and Technology,Department of Medical Device Management & Research, Department of DigitalHealth, SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, The Republic of Korea
  1. Correspondence to Dr. Yong-Il Shin; rmshin01{at}gmail.com and Yun-Hee Kim; yunkim{at}skku.edu

Abstract

Objective To investigate the rate of return to work and identify key factors associated with return to work between 3 months and 2 years after stroke.

Design Prospective cohort study.

Setting The Korean Stroke Cohort for Functioning and Rehabilitation (KOSCO) in Korea.

Participants A total of 193 persons with first-ever stroke who reported working status at 3 months after stroke.

Outcome measures Data on baseline characteristics were collected from medical records. Functional assessments were performed using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, the modified Rankin Scale, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, the Functional Ambulatory Category, the Korean Mini-Mental State Examination, the Korean version of the Frenchay Aphasia Screening Test, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association National Outcomes Measurement System, the Korean-Modified Barthel Index, the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form and the EuroQol-5 dimensions. An enumeration survey included the Reintegration to Normal Living Index, the Psychosocial Well-being Index-Short Form (, the Family Support Index and the Caregivers Burden Index.

Results Overall, 145 (75.1%) patients who had a stroke in the "Continuously-Employed" group and 48 (24.9%) in the "Employed-Unemployed" group returned to work between 3 months and 2 years after stroke. Multivariate logistic analysis demonstrated that in patients who had a stroke, characteristics such as age, PWI-SF Score, and caregiver characteristics, including age, sex (female) and living arrangements, were significantly associated with return to work between 3 months and 2 years after stroke.

Conclusion Age and PWI-SF Score of patients who had a stroke, as well as the age, sex and living arrangements of caregivers, are key factors influencing the return to work after stroke.

Trial registration number NCT03402451.

  • work
  • return to work
  • employment
  • persons with stroke
  • vocational rehabilitation

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Footnotes

  • JH and HIL contributed equally.

  • Y-IS and Y-HK contributed equally.

  • Contributors JH contributed to the analysis and interpretation of stroke patient data and final approval of the version to be published; HIL, Y-IS contributed to the study conception and design, acquisition of data, manuscript drafting and final approval of the version to be published. JHS, S-YK, DYK, MKS, JL, S-GL, G-JO, Y-SL, MCJ, EYH, WHC contributed to the study conception and design, and acquisition of data. Y-HK contributed to the study conception and design, critical revision of the manuscript and final approval of the version to be published. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

  • Funding This work was supported by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (grant number 2019E320200).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital (Institutional Review Board number: 05-2012-057), and the participating hospitals were approved by their respective ethics committees.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data sharing statement Data are available from the corresponding author, Y-HK, upon request.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

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