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in-DEPtH framework: evidence-informed, co-creation framework for the Design, Evaluation and Procurement of Health services
  1. Kenneth Lo1,2,
  2. Jonathan Karnon2
  1. 1Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Australian Institute of Health Innovation, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  2. 2College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Kenneth Lo; kenneth.lo{at}flinders.edu.au

Abstract

With a multitude of variables, the combinations of care, health program activities and outcomes are infinite, and this renders improvement efforts to complex health service interventions particularly intricate. Here, we describe a framework that seeks to incorporate research evidence and the multi-faceted considerations of stakeholders, context and resources to co-create sustainable health solutions that improve the health outcomes of patients and communities. This evidence-informed, co-creation framework for the Design, Evaluation and Procurement of Health services (in-DEPtH) is a systematic approach to support health agencies to commission services that are evidence-informed, contextually relevant and stakeholder engaged. The framework consists of several steps from defining the research question, health outcomes and search inclusion criteria, to the synthesis of evidence, and to co-creation and Delphi consultations with stakeholders. In this paper, we describe the various steps of the framework and explain the theoretical methods underpinning the framework. The approach of the framework is context neutral and can be applied to healthcare systems of different countries.

  • health services research
  • health services administration
  • healthcare systems
  • public health systems research
  • translational research

This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors KL wrote the first draft of this manuscript, and KL and JK contributed to the writing. All authors have read and commented on the results and conclusions in the manuscript, and have given written agreement of their authorship. KL is the corresponding author of the article. The corresponding author attests that all listed authors meet authorship criteria and that no others meeting the criteria have been omitted.

  • Funding KL and JK report grants from Australia National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Partnership Centre For Health System Sustainability (Grant ID: 9100002), during the conduct of the study.

  • Competing interests KL and JK report grants from Australia National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Partnership Centre For Health System Sustainability (Grant ID: 9100002), during the conduct of the study; KL and JK have no financial relationships with any organisations that might have an interest in the submitted work in the previous three years, and no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data sharing statement No additional data are available.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

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