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Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption, correlates and interventions among Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities: a scoping review
  1. Kathleen M Wright1,2,
  2. Joanne Dono1,2,
  3. Aimee L Brownbill1,3,
  4. Odette Pearson (nee Gibson)4,5,
  5. Jacqueline Bowden1,2,
  6. Thomas P Wycherley6,
  7. Wendy Keech4,7,
  8. Kerin O’Dea6,
  9. David Roder6,
  10. Jodie C Avery1,8,
  11. Caroline L Miller1,3
  1. 1 Population Health Research Group, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  2. 2 School of Psychology, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  3. 3 School of Public Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  4. 4 Wardliparingga Aboriginal Research Unit, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  5. 5 Sansom Institute, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  6. 6 School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  7. 7 Health Translation SA, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  8. 8 Adelaide Medical School, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Kathleen M Wright; kathleen.wright{at}sahmri.com

Abstract

Objectives Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is reported to be disproportionally high compared with the general Australian population. This review aimed to scope the literature documenting SSB consumption and interventions to reduce SSB consumption among Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Findings will inform strategies to address SSB consumption in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Methods PubMed, SCOPUS, CINAHL, Informit, Joanna Briggs Institute EBP, Mura databases and grey literature were searched for articles published between January 1980 and June 2018. Studies were included if providing data specific to an Australian Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander population’s SSB consumption or an intervention that focused on reducing SSB consumption in this population.

Design Systematic scoping review.

Results 59 articles were included (1846 screened). While reported SSB consumption was high, there were age-related and community-related differences observed in some studies. Most studies were conducted in remote or rural settings. Implementation of nutrition interventions that included an SSB component has built progressively in remote communities since the 1980s with a growing focus on community-driven, culturally sensitive approaches. More recent studies have focused exclusively on SSB consumption. Key SSB-related intervention elements included incentivising healthier options; reducing availability of less-healthy options; nutrition education; multifaceted or policy implementation (store nutrition or government policy).

Conclusions There was a relatively large number of studies reporting data on SSB consumption and/or sales, predominantly from remote and rural settings. During analysis it was subjectively clear that the more impactful studies were those which were community driven or involved extensive community consultation and collaboration. Extracting additional SSB-specific consumption data from an existing nationally representative survey of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people could provide detailed information for demographic subgroups and benchmarks for future interventions. It is recommended that a consistent, culturally appropriate, set of consumption measures be developed.

  • sugar-sweetened beverages
  • soft drinks
  • sodas
  • indigenous
  • aboriginal
  • Australia

This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors JAB, CLM, JD and DR conceived the idea for the project. JCA, JB, JD, OG, WK and CLM developed the research question. JD, CLM, and ALB provided expertise on sugar sweetened beverages. OG and WK provided expertise in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research, the relevance of the research direction and method to answer the question. KO and TPW provided expertise in dietary intake research in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. JCA drafted the protocol manuscript. KMW conducted literature searches, screening, data extraction, data synthesis, writing of manuscript and coordination of manuscript editing. ALB assisted with the preliminary literature search, grey literature searches and data extraction. JD and JAB provided strategic input for data synthesis. All authors read, provided critical review and approved the manuscript.

  • Funding This work was supported by the University of South Australia and the NHMRC Program Grant no. 631947.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data sharing statement No additional unpublished data are available.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

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