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Neighbourhood greenspace and physical activity and sedentary behaviour among older adults with a recent diagnosis of type 2 diabetes: a prospective analysis
  1. Shanley Chong1,2,
  2. Soumya Mazumdar1,2,
  3. Ding Ding3,
  4. Geoff Morgan3,
  5. Elizabeth Jean Comino4,
  6. Adrian Bauman3,
  7. Bin Jalaludin1,5
  1. 1 Population Health, South Western Sydney Local Health District, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia
  2. 2 South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  3. 3 Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  4. 4 Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  5. 5 School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Professor Bin Jalaludin; Bin.Jalaludin{at}health.nsw.gov.au

Abstract

Objectives Greenspace is one of the important factors that can promote an active lifestyle. Thus, greener surroundings may be a motivating factor for people with newly diagnosed diabetes to engage in more physical activity. Given that diagnosis of type 2 diabetes (T2D) may serve as a window opportunity for behavioural modification, we hypothesise that the association between neighbourhood greenspace and physical activity among people with newly diagnosed T2D may be greater than those not diagnosed with T2D. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between access to greenspace and changes in physical activity and sedentary behaviour, and whether these associations differed by T2D.

Design Prospective cohort.

Setting New South Wales, Australia.

Methods We used self-reported information from the New South Wales 45 and Up Study (baseline) and a follow-up study. Information on sitting, walking and moderate to vigorous physical activity was used as outcomes. The proportion of greenspace within 500 m, 1 km and 2 km road network buffers around participant’s residential address was generated as a proxy measure for access to greenspace. The association between the access to greenspace and the outcomes were explored among the newly diagnosed T2D group and those without T2D.

Results Among New T2D, although no significant changes were found in the amount of walking with the percentage of greenspace, increasing trends were apparent. There was no significant association between the percentage of greenspace and changes in amount of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Among No T2D, there were no significant associations between the amount of MVPA and walking, and percentage of greenspace. For changes in sitting time, there were no significant associations with percentage of greenspace regardless of buffer size.

Conclusions In this study, there was no association between access to greenspace at baseline and change in walking, MVPA and sitting time, regardless of T2D status.

  • physical activity
  • diabetes
  • green space

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Footnotes

  • Contributors SC participated in the design of the study, carried out the statistical analyses and drafted the manuscript. SM participated in the design of the study, helped draft the manuscript, helped with the interpretation and revised the manuscript. DD helped draft the manuscript, helped with the interpretation of the data and revised the manuscript. GM, EJC and AB helped with the interpretation of the data and revised the manuscript. BJ supervised the study, helped draft the manuscript, helped with the interpretation of the data and revised the manuscript.

  • Funding The research was funded from a NH&MRC Preventative Healthcare and Strengthening Australia’s Social and Economic Fabric Program Grant.

  • Map disclaimer The depiction of boundaries on this map does not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of BMJ (or any member of its group) concerning the legal status of any country, territory, jurisdiction or area or of its authorities. This map is provided without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication In the 45 and Up Study, participants completed a baseline questionnaire and have provided informed consent for long-term follow-up and for the use of their data for research purposes.

  • Ethics approval The baseline 45 and Up Study and the SEEF Study were approved by the University of New South Wales Human Research Ethics Committee and the University of Sydney Human Research Ethics Committee, respectively.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement Data may be obtained from a third party and are not publicly available.

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