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The association between sleep duration, sleep quality, and food consumption in adolescents: A cross-sectional study using the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey
  1. Chanyang Min1,2,
  2. Hyung-Jong Kim3,
  3. Il-Seok Park4,
  4. Bumjung Park3,
  5. Jin-Hwan Kim5,
  6. Songyong Sim6,
  7. Hyo Geun Choi1,3
  1. 1 Hallym Data Science Laboratory, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Republic of Korea
  2. 2 Graduate School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  3. 3 Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Republic of Korea
  4. 4 Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Hallym University College of Medicine, Dongtan, Republic of Korea
  5. 5 Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  6. 6 Department of Statistics, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Republic of Korea
  1. Correspondence to Dr Hyo Geun Choi; pupen{at}naver.com

Abstract

Objective This study examined the relationship between sleep duration, sleep quality and food consumption among adolescents.

Design Cross-sectional study.

Setting Data from the 2014 and 2015 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey were used.

Participants Participants aged 12–18 years (n=118 462 (59 431 males and 59 031 females)) were selected.

Primary and secondary outcome measures Sleep duration, sleep quality and the frequencies of fruits, soda, soft drinks, fast food, instant noodle, confectionaries, vegetables and milk consumption.

Results Short sleep durations (<6 hours) were associated with higher soft drinks and confectionaries intake than longer sleep durations (9+ hours) (adjusted ORs (AORs) (95% CIs) for ≥5 times a week for soft drinks: 1.73 (1.57 to 1.91) and confectionaries: 1.32 (1.20 to 1.46); p<0.001). Poor sleep quality, with 7–8 hours of sleep, was associated with a lower intake of fruits, vegetables and milk (AORs (95% CIs) for ≥5 times a week for fruits: 0.71 (0.65 to 0.77); vegetables: 0.66 (0.58 to 0.75); and milk: 0.80 (0.74 to 0.86); each p<0.001), and higher intake of soda, soft drinks, fast food, instant noodle and confectionaries (AORs (95% CIs) for ≥5 times a week for soda: 1.55 (1.40 to 1.70); soft drinks: 1.58 (1.43 to 1.73); fast food: 1.97 (1.65 to 2.35); instant noodle: 1.55 (1.37 to 1.76); and confectionaries: 1.30 (1.18 to 1.43); each p<0.001) than good sleep quality of the same duration.

Conclusion Short sleep durations and poor sleep quality might be associated with higher consumption of unhealthier foods, such as sugar-sweetened beverages, fast food, instant noodle and confectionaries, and associated with lower consumption of fruits, vegetables and milk.

  • sleep duration
  • sleep quality
  • food consumption
  • food frequency
  • sugar-sweetened beverages
  • fast food
  • fruits
  • vegetables
  • adolescents
  • Korean

This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See:©http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors CM wrote the manuscript. H-JK designed the study. I-SP performed the data processing. BP performed the data interpretation. J-HK analysed the data. SS, as co-corresponding author, gave statistical techniques and reviewed the manuscript. HGC, as corresponding author, conceptualised the study and wrote and reviewed the manuscript. HGC and SS are equally contributed in this study.

  • Funding This research was supported by Hallym University Research Fund.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Not required.

  • Ethics approval Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of Korea.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data sharing statement No additional data are available.

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