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Effectiveness of targeting the health promotion settings for non-communicable disease control in low/middle-income countries: systematic review protocol
  1. Gursimer Jeet1,
  2. Jarnail Singh Thakur1,
  3. Shankar Prinja1,
  4. Meenu Singh2,
  5. Ronika Paika1,
  6. Kunjan Kunjan1,
  7. Priya Dhadwal1
  1. 1 School of Public Health, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
  2. 2 Advanced Paediatric Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
  1. Correspondence to Dr Gursimer Jeet; gsj_2008{at}yahoo.com

Abstract

Introduction Settings-based approaches to health promotion, involving holistic and multidisciplinary methods, which integrate action across risk factors are important. Major advantage of focusing on these settings is the continuous and intensive contact with the participant. Despite the apparent advantages of addressing non-communicable diseases (NCDs) using targeted interventions for several developed country settings, a relative lack of evidence of effectiveness of such interventions in low/middle-income countries has led to poor allocation of resources towards these interventions. The focus is therefore on the settings rather than any one condition, and we therefore expect the findings to generalise to NCD prevention and control efforts. We intend to estimate the effectiveness of targeted interventions in low/middle-income countries.

Methods and analysis We will search PubMed, Excerpta Medica Database, OVID, WHO Library and The Cochrane Library from the year 2000 to March 2018 without language restrictions. Study designs to be included will be randomised controlled trials. The primary outcome of effectiveness will be the percentage change in population having different behavioural risk factors. Subgroup analyses will be performed, and sensitivity analyses will be conducted to assess the robustness of the findings.

Ethics and dissemination No ethical issues are foreseen. The Institute Ethics Committee of the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research approved the doctoral research protocol under which this review is being done. Dissemination will be done by submitting scientific articles to academic peer-reviewed journals. We will present the results at relevant conferences and meetings.

Study design Systematic review.

PROSPERO registration number CRD42016042647; Pre-results.

  • Targeted Interventions
  • NCDs
  • Risk Factors
  • Healthy Settings

This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt and build upon this work, for commercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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Footnotes

  • Contributors Concept and design of study: JST, GJ, SP and MS. Refining the methodology and data abstraction tools: GJ, KK, PD and RP. Drafting the manuscript: GJ, KK, PD and RP. Revising the manuscript critically for important intellectual content: MS, SP and JST. Final approval of the version to be published: JST, SP and MS.

  • Funding This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Not required.

  • Ethics approval The Institute Ethics Committee of the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research approved the doctoral research protocol under which this review is being done.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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