Article Text

Premenstrual syndrome and alcohol consumption: a systematic review and meta-analysis
  1. María del Mar Fernández1,2,
  2. Jurgita Saulyte1,2,
  3. Hazel M Inskip3,4,
  4. Bahi Takkouche1,2
  1. 1 Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
  2. 2 Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBER-ESP), Madrid, Spain
  3. 3 MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
  4. 4 NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, University of Southampton and University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Bahi Takkouche; bahi.takkouche{at}usc.es

Abstract

Objective Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a very common disorder worldwide which carries an important economic burden. We conducted a systematic review and a meta-analysis to assess the role of alcohol in the occurrence of PMS.

Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the five regional bibliographic databases of the WHO, the Proceedings database and the Open Access Thesis and Dissertations (OATD) from inception to May 2017. We also reviewed the references of every article retrieved and established personal contact with researchers to trace further publications or reports. We did not include any language limitations. Studies were included if: (1) they presented original data from cohort, case-control or cross-sectional studies, (2) PMS was clearly defined as the outcome of interest, (3) one of the exposure factors was alcohol consumption, (4) they provided estimates of odds ratios, relative risks, or any other effect measure and their confidence intervals, or enough data to calculate them.

Results We identified 39 studies of which 19 were eligible. Intake of alcohol was associated with a moderate increase in the risk of PMS (OR=1.45, 95% CI: 1.17 to 1.79). Heavy drinking yielded a larger increase in the risk than any drinking (OR=1.79, 95% CI: 1.39 to 2.32).

Discussion Our results suggest that alcohol intake presents a moderate association with PMS risk. Future studies should avoid cross-sectional designs and focus on determining whether there is a threshold of alcohol intake under which the harmful effect on PMS is non-existent.

  • meta-analysis
  • premenstrual syndrome
  • alcohol

This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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Footnotes

  • Contributors MdM performed the computerized systematic search, literature revision, risk of bias assessment, meta-analysis and redaction of the manuscript, figures and tables. JS assessed the risk of bias and revised the manuscript. HI provided unpublished data and participated in the redaction of the manuscript. BT did the complementary searches, assessment of the publication bias and revision of the final manuscript, figures and tables. He acts as a guarantor of the study.

  • Funding This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data sharing statement No additional data available besides those available in the tables and supplementary files of this manuscript. The database ready to be analyzed can be obtained from the corresponding author upon request.

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