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Influence of family history on prognosis of spinal pain and the role of leisure time physical activity and body mass index: a prospective study using family-linkage data from the Norwegian HUNT study
  1. Anita B Amorim1,
  2. Paulo H Ferreira1,
  3. Manuela L Ferreira2,
  4. Ragnhild Lier3,
  5. Milena Simic1,
  6. Evangelos Pappas1,
  7. Joshua R Zadro1,
  8. Paul Jarle Mork3,
  9. Tom IL Nilsen3,4
  1. 1 Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Discipline of Physiotherapy, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  2. 2 Institute of Bone and Joint Research, The Kolling Institute, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  3. 3 Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
  4. 4 Clinic of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
  1. Correspondence to Dr Tom IL Nilsen; tom.nilsen{at}ntnu.no

Abstract

Objectives To investigate the influence of parental chronic spinal pain on prognosis of chronic spinal pain in adult offspring, and whether offspring physical activity level and body mass index (BMI) modified this association.

Design Prospective cohort study.

Setting We used family-linked longitudinal data from the Norwegian HUNT study collected in HUNT2 (1995–1997) and HUNT3 (2006–2008).

Participants A total of 1529 offspring who reported spinal pain in HUNT2 were linked with parental data and followed up in HUNT3.

Outcomes We estimated relative risk (RR) with 95% CI for recovery from chronic spinal pain, and also from activity limiting spinal pain, in offspring related to chronic spinal pain in parents. We also investigated whether offspring leisure time physical activity and BMI modified these intergenerational associations in spinal pain.

Results A total of 540 (35%) offspring were defined as recovered after approximately 11 years of follow-up. Offspring with both parents reporting chronic spinal pain were less likely to recover from chronic spinal pain (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.99) and activity limiting spinal pain (RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.94), compared with offspring of parents without chronic spinal pain. Analyses stratified by BMI and physical activity showed no strong evidence of effect modification on these associations. However, offspring who were overweight/obese and with both parents reporting chronic spinal pain had particularly low probability of recovery from activity limiting spinal pain, compared with those who were normal weight and had parents without chronic spinal pain (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.84).

Conclusion Offspring with chronic spinal pain are less likely to recover if they have parents with chronic spinal pain, particularly if offspring are overweight/obese.

  • low back pain
  • neck pain
  • chronic pain
  • obesity
  • family study
  • physical activity

This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors All authors critically revised the manuscript for important intellectual content and approved the final manuscript. Please find below a detailed description of the role of each author: ABA: conception and design, analysis and interpretation of data, drafting and revision of the manuscript and final approval of the version to be published. PHF: conception and design, interpretation of data, drafting and revision of the manuscript and final approval of the version to be published. MLF: conception and design, drafting and revision of the manuscript and final approval of the version to be published. RL: conception and design, drafting and revision of the manuscript and final approval of the version to be published. MS: conception and design, drafting and revision of the manuscript and final approval of the version to be published. EP: conception and design, drafting and revision of the manuscript and final approval of the version to be published. JRZ: conception and design, interpretation of data, drafting and revision of the manuscript and final approval of the version to be published. PJM: conception and design, acquisition and interpretation of data, drafting and revision of the manuscript and final approval of the version to be published. TILN: conception and design, acquisition and interpretation of data, drafting and revision of the manuscript and final approval of the version to be published.

  • Funding This research was supported by a grant from the Department of Public Health and Nursing, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

  • Disclaimer This funding source had no role in the study’s design, data collection, analysis, interpretation of the data or the decision to submit the paper for publication.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Ethics approval The study was approved by the Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics Central Norway (ref. no. 2011/1455).

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data sharing statement No additional data are available.