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Exploring the association between chorangioma and infantile haemangioma in singleton and multiple pregnancies: a case–control study in a Swedish tertiary centre
  1. Meeli Sirotkina1,2,
  2. Konstantinos Douroudis3,4,
  3. Carl-Fredrik Wahlgren5,6,
  4. Magnus Westgren7,8,
  5. Nikos Papadogiannakis1,2
  1. 1 Section of Perinatal Pathology, Department of Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden
  2. 2 Division of Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
  3. 3 Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway
  4. 4 Department of Clinical Medicine, Universitetet i Bergen, Bergen, Norway
  5. 5 Dermatology Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
  6. 6 Department of Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Stockholm, Sweden
  7. 7 Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
  8. 8 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
  1. Correspondence to Dr Meeli Sirotkina; meeli.sirotkina{at}ki.se

Abstract

Objectives Placenta or placental chorangioma could be the origin site of infantile haemangioma since they share various histochemical and genetic characteristics with placental vascular tissue. The aim of the current study was to investigate the association between chorangiomas and infantile haemangiomas in singleton and multiple pregnancies.

Materials and methods An informative questionnaire enquiring about the presence or not of infantile haemangioma and including illustrative photos of haemangioma was sent to 469 (153 cases with chorangioma and 316 controls) mothers of 323 singleton (104 cases and 219 controls) and 146 multiple (49 cases and 97 controls) liveborn neonates registered in Sweden. Overall, 310 mothers (66.1%) from 216 singleton and 94 multiple pregnancies (96 cases and 214 controls) provided feedback and their consent to participate in the current case–control study.

Results The incidence of infantile haemangioma showed no statistically significant differences between cases and controls (18.8% vs 18.2%) or between singleton and multiple pregnancies (18.9% vs 17.0%). The frequency of pre-eclampsia was significantly higher in cases with chorangioma compared with controls (41.7% vs 24.3%, OR=2.22, 95% CI 1.33 to 3.71, p=0.0022) and in singleton compared with multiple pregnancies (33.3% vs 21.3%, OR=1.85, 95% CI 1.04 to 3.26, p=0.034), whereas there were no significant differences in the incidence of infantile haemangioma in neonates of mothers with or without pre-eclampsia or in neonates of mothers with multiple compared with singleton pregnancies.

Conclusion There was no association between placental chorangiomas and infantile haemangiomas. Multiple pregnancies or pre-eclampsia were not significantly related to higher incidence of infantile haemangioma.

  • Chorangioma
  • infantile hemangioma
  • multiple pregnancies
  • preeclampsia

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Footnotes

  • Contributors MS conceptualised and designed the study, carried out the examination of histological slides, initial statistical analysis and the clinical assessment of the material, drafted the initial manuscript, and approved the final manuscript as submitted. KD carried out the statistical analysis and interpretation of data, reviewed and revised the manuscript, and approved the final manuscript as submitted. C-FW designed the study, carried out the clinical assessment of the material, critically reviewed the manuscript and approved the final manuscript as submitted. MW conceptualised and designed the study, carried out the clinical assessment of the material, reviewed and revised the manuscript, and approved the final manuscript as submitted. NP conceptualised and designed the study, carried out the examination of histological slides and clinical assessment of the material, reviewed and revised the manuscript, and approved the final manuscript as submitted.

  • Funding This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval The Regional Ethical Review Board in Stockholm.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data sharing statement No additional data available.

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