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A scoping review protocol on social participation of indigenous elders, intergenerational solidarity and their influence on individual and community wellness
  1. Chantal Viscogliosi1,2,
  2. Hugo Asselin1,
  3. Suzy Basile1,
  4. Yves Couturier2,3,
  5. Marie-Josée Drolet4,
  6. Dominique Gagnon5,
  7. Jill Torrie6,
  8. Mélanie Levasseur2,7
  1. 1 School of Indigenous Studies, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Rouyn-Noranda, Québec, Canada
  2. 2 Research Centre on Aging, Centre integre universitaire de sante et de services sociaux de l'Estrie-Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada
  3. 3 Chaire de recherche du Canada sur les pratiques professionnelles d’intégration des services en gérontologie, Faculté des lettres et sciences humaines, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada
  4. 4 Département d’ergothérapie, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, Québec, Canada
  5. 5 Unité d’enseignement et de recherche en sciences du développement humain et social, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue - Campus de Val-d'Or, Val-d'Or, Québec, Canada
  6. 6 Department of Public-Health, Cree Board of Health and Social Services of James Bay, Mistissini, Québec, Canada
  7. 7 School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada
  1. Correspondence to Chantal Viscogliosi; chantal.viscogliosi{at}usherbrooke.ca

Abstract

Introduction Indigenous elders have traditionally played an important role in maintaining social cohesion within their communities. Today, part of this role has been taken over by government social and healthcare services, but they are having limited success in addressing social challenges. Increasing elders’ social participation and intergenerational solidarity might foster community development and benefit young people, families, communities and the elders themselves. However, knowledge of the contribution of elders’ social participation and intergenerational solidarity to wellness is scattered and needs to be synthesised. This protocol presents a scoping review on the social participation of indigenous elders, intergenerational solidarity and their influence on individual and community wellness.

Methods and analysis This scoping review protocol is based on an innovative methodological framework designed to gather information from the scientific and grey literature and from indigenous sources. It was developed by an interdisciplinary team including indigenous scholars/researchers, knowledge users and key informants. In addition to searching information databases in fields such as public health and indigenous studies, an advisory committee will ensure that information is gathered from grey literature and indigenous sources.

Ethics The protocol was approved by the Ethics Review Board of the Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue and the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Health and Social Services Commission.

Discussion The comprehensive synthesis of the scientific and grey literature and indigenous sources proposed in this protocol will not only raise awareness within indigenous communities and among healthcare professionals and community organisations, but will also enable decision-makers to better meet the needs of indigenous people.

Conclusion The innovative methodological framework proposed in this scoping review protocol will yield richer information on the contribution of elders to community wellness. This work is an essential preliminary step towards developing research involving indigenous communities, drawing on the social participation of elders and intergenerational solidarity.

  • aboriginal people
  • first nation
  • well-being
  • health promotion
  • resilience
  • intergenerational solidarity
  • community involvement.

This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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Footnotes

  • Contributors CV initiated the project with HA and ML and wrote the paper. HA and ML supervised the project and contributed to writing the protocol. SB, YC, M-JD, DG, and JT revised the manuscript.

  • Funding This work is supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), grant number 872-2016-0011. ML is a Fonds de la recherche en santé du Québec (FRSQ) Junior 1 Researcher (no 26815; 2013-2017) and a Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) New Investigator (no 360880; 2017-2022).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Ethics approval Ethical approval was obtained from Ethics Review Board of the Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue (2016-11)

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.