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Investigating Canadian parents' HPV vaccine knowledge, attitudes and behaviour: a study protocol for a longitudinal national online survey
  1. Gilla K Shapiro1,2,
  2. Samara Perez1,2,
  3. Anila Naz2,
  4. Ovidiu Tatar2,
  5. Juliet R Guichon3,
  6. Rhonda Amsel1,
  7. Gregory D Zimet4,
  8. Zeev Rosberger1,7,2,5,6
  1. 1 Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  2. 2 Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  3. 3 Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  4. 4 Section of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
  5. 5 Louise Granofsky Psychosocial Oncology Program, Segal Cancer Center, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  6. 6 Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  7. 7 Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  1. Correspondence to Gilla K Shapiro; gilla.shapiro{at}mail.mcgill.ca

Abstract

Introduction Human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted infection, can cause anogenital warts and a number of cancers. To prevent morbidity and mortality, three vaccines have been licensed and are recommended by Canada’s National Advisory Committee on Immunisation (for girls since 2007 and boys since 2012). Nevertheless, HPV vaccine coverage in Canada remains suboptimal in many regions. This study will be the first to concurrently examine the correlates of HPV vaccine decision-making in parents of school-aged girls and boys and evaluate changes in parental knowledge, attitudes and behaviours over time.

Methods and analysis Using a national, online survey utilising theoretically driven constructs and validated measures, this study will identify HPV vaccine coverage rates and correlates of vaccine decision-making in Canada at two time points (August–September 2016 and June–July 2017). 4606 participants will be recruited to participate in an online survey through a market research and polling firm using email invitations. Data cleaning methods will identify inattentive or unmotivated participants.

Ethics and dissemination The study received research ethics board approval from the Research Review Office, Integrated Health and Social Services University Network for West-Central Montreal (CODIM-FLP-16–219). The study will adopt a multimodal approach to disseminate the study’s findings to researchers, clinicians, cancer and immunisation organisations and the public in Canada and internationally.

  • attitudes
  • behaviour
  • Canada
  • cancer prevention
  • decision-making
  • human papillomavirus
  • knowledge
  • sexually transmitted infections
  • parents
  • vaccination

This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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Footnotes

  • Contributors GKS conceived and designed the study, developed the survey and wrote the manuscript. AN and OT participated in designing the study, assisted in drafting the manuscript and provided critical feedback on manuscript revisions. SP, JRG, GDZ and RA provided critical feedback on manuscript revisions. ZR conceived and designed the study, developed the survey and provided critical feedback on manuscript revisions. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

  • Funding This work was supported by the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute under the title ’Understanding HPV Vaccine Hesitancy among Canadian Parents' (grant number: 704036). GKS was supported by the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship and Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Scholarship programs.

  • Competing interests ZR reports grants from the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute during the conduct of the study and personal fees from Merck outside the submitted work. GDZ reports grants from Merck and personal fees from Sanofi Pasteur, outside the submitted work. The remaining authors declare no conflict of interest.

  • Ethics approval The study received research ethics board approval from the Research Review Office, Integrated Health and Social Services University Network for West-Central Montreal (CODIM-FLP-16-219).

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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