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Relationship between education levels and booster counselling sessions on smoking cessation among Chinese smokers
  1. Lei Wu1,2,
  2. Yao He1,2,3,
  3. Bin Jiang4,
  4. Fang Zuo4,
  5. Qinghui Liu5,
  6. Li Zhang6,
  7. Changxi Zhou5,
  8. Miao Liu1,2,
  9. Hongyan Chen1,2
  1. 1Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Geriatrics, Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, China
  2. 2Beijing Key Laboratory of Aging and Geriatrics, Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, China
  3. 3State Key Laboratory of Kidney Disease, Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, China
  4. 4Department of Acupuncture, Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, China
  5. 5Department of Respiration, Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, China
  6. 6Department of Rehabilitation, Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, China
  1. Correspondence to Professor Yao He; yhe301{at}x263.net

Abstract

Objectives Although various effective interventions are available to help individuals quit smoking, the effect of educational levels on cessation rates has rarely been studied, and of the few intervention studies on this topic, the results have been conflicting.

Design and setting From October 2008 to August 2013, a partly retrospective non-randomised study was conducted in a smoking cessation clinic of a large general hospital in Beijing, China.

Participants In total, 547 Chinese smokers who sought treatment were divided into two groups: a face-to-face counselling group (FC, n=149) and an FC group subjected to four telephone follow-up sessions (FCF, n=398).

Outcomes We evaluated self-reported cessation rates by day 7 and after 6 and 12 months and stratified the two groups by education levels.

Results The 7-day and 6-month and 12-month continuous cessation rates of smokers of low education levels in the FC group at the time of the 12-month follow-up were 12.5%, 7.1% and 7.1%, respectively, which were lower than those of the highly educated smokers (16.1%, 12.9% and 9.7%, respectively). The results were opposite for the FCF group. The corresponding results for the highly educated smokers of the FCF group were 25.0%, 17.2% and 10.3%, respectively, which were lower than those for the smokers of low education levels (28.3%, 22.9% and 18.1%, respectively). However, significant differences were observed only among the FCF group participants who had experienced 12 months of continuous abstinence, and the crude OR for these individuals was recorded at 0.52 (0.29 to 0.93), p=0.03. A stepwise logistic regression showed that education levels may play a role in various intervention methods. Being married and higher Fagerström test scores were also predictors of cessation tendencies.

Conclusions Education levels may affect the benefits of booster counselling sessions on smoking cessation among Chinese smokers.

  • EPIDEMIOLOGY
  • PUBLIC HEALTH
  • SOCIAL MEDICINE

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