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Cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccine acceptability among rural and urban women in Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania
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Other responses

  • Published on:
    Response: Assessing knowledge and attitudes regarding HPV vaccination among those who have never heard of it

    Thank you for your detailed reading of our paper, we appreciate you bringing this concern to our attention. As described previously, respondents who had not heard of the HPV vaccine were briefly educated. Specifically, we read them the following statement: "Human Papillomavirus (HPV) can cause cervical cancer. HPV is not the same as HIV. Vaccines are medications given to prevent the development of disease or illness." R...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Assessing knowledge and attitudes regarding HPV vaccination among those who have never heard of it

    This article by Cunningham et al. on cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccine acceptability is a large population based study that collected self-reported responses - the authors mentioned the same as a study limitation. However, by detailed reading of Table 4, it appears that respondents who had not heard of the HPV vaccine were asked about attitudinal questions like 'willing to definitely accept the HPV vaccine', 'beli...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.