Article Text

A randomised controlled study of the long-term effects of exercise training on mortality in elderly people: study protocol for the Generation 100 study
  1. Dorthe Stensvold1,2,
  2. Hallgeir Viken1,2,
  3. Øivind Rognmo1,2,
  4. Eirik Skogvoll2,3,
  5. Sigurd Steinshamn1,4,
  6. Lars J Vatten1,5,
  7. Jeff S Coombes6,
  8. Sigmund A Anderssen7,
  9. Jon Magnussen5,
  10. Jan Erik Ingebrigtsen8,
  11. Maria A Fiatarone Singh9,10,11,
  12. Arnulf Langhammer5,
  13. Asbjørn Støylen3,12,
  14. Jorunn L Helbostad13,14,
  15. Ulrik Wisløff1
  1. 1KG Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
  2. 2St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
  3. 3Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
  4. 4Department of Thoracic Medicine, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
  5. 5Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
  6. 6School of Human Movement Studies, University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia
  7. 7Department of Sports Medicine, The Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway
  8. 8Institute for Science in Sport, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
  9. 9Exercise Health and Performance Faculty Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, Australia
  10. 10Hebrew Senior Life, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  11. 11Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  12. 12Department of Cardiology, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
  13. 13Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
  14. 14Clinic for Clinical Services, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
  1. Correspondence to Dr Dorthe Stensvold; Dorthe.stensvold{at}ntnu.no

Abstract

Introduction Epidemiological studies suggest that exercise has a tremendous preventative effect on morbidity and premature death, but these findings need to be confirmed by randomised trials. Generation 100 is a randomised, controlled study where the primary aim is to evaluate the effects of 5 years of exercise training on mortality in an elderly population.

Methods and analysis All men and women born in the years 1936–1942 (n=6966), who were residents of Trondheim, Norway, were invited to participate. Between August 2012 and June 2013, a total of 1567 individuals (790 women) were included and randomised to either 5 years of two weekly sessions of high-intensity training (10 min warm-up followed by 4×4 min intervals at ∼90% of peak heart rate) or, moderate-intensity training (50 min of continuous work at ∼70% of peak heart rate), or to a control group that followed physical activity advice according to national recommendations. Clinical examinations, physical tests and questionnaires will be administered to all participants at baseline, and after 1, 3 and 5 years. Participants will also be followed up by linking to health registries until year 2035.

Ethics and dissemination The study has been conducted according to the SPIRIT statement. All participants signed a written consent form, and the study has been approved by the Regional Committee for Medical Research Ethics, Norway. Projects such as this are warranted in the literature, and we expect that data from this study will result in numerous papers published in world-leading clinical journals; we will also present the results at international and national conferences.

Trial registration number Clinical trial gov NCT01666340.

  • PUBLIC HEALTH
  • SPORTS MEDICINE
  • CLINICAL PHYSIOLOGY

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