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The impact of complaints procedures on the welfare, health and clinical practise of 7926 doctors in the UK: a cross-sectional survey
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  • Published on:
    Re:The volume of complaints against doctors and how they are handled are not necessarily in the best interests of patients and harms doctors. New solutions are needed based on good quality evidence.
    Flying is safe, and health care is dangerous-why? Prior to 1977, the airline industry ran quality improvement and pilot oversight as medicine does now, using the "Captain of the Ship" model, presuming that quality was to be had by making pilots better and better so they were infallible (and blaming 'pilot error' for bad outcomes.) At Tenerife, KLM's head 747 instructor and head of their safety program made an error, along with o...
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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re:The volume of complaints against doctors and how they are handled are not necessarily in the best interests of patients and harms doctors. New solutions are needed based on good quality evidence.

    I have specific interest in this article, as my cancer was misdiagnosed by ten to fifteen doctors, across three counties, over a great number of years.

    The backlog of complaints I made to The Department of Health (and later many other health bodies), were either unanswered or answered grossly inappropriately.

    Instead of this complaint being used as the wake-up call it ought to have been, it's (inc...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    "Don't talk to the driver"

    Lawyers think in terms of crime, homicide with or without premeditation, fraud, legal responsibility, economic damage, indemnification and guilt. Terms medical doctors are not so familiar with. Medical doctors think in terms of patients, differential diagnosis, treatment options, cure and care. Because the primary aim of practising medicine is to help patients, we are particularly affected if something goes wrong, especial...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    The volume of complaints against doctors and how they are handled are not necessarily in the best interests of patients and harms doctors. New solutions are needed based on good quality evidence.
    • Tom Bourne, Doctor
    • Other Contributors:
      • Maria Jalmbrant, Dirk Timmerman, Ben van Calster

    We would like to thank Niall Dickson for his interest in our paper (1). As Dickson suggests, being the subject of an investigation in any profession is likely to be associated with stress and anxiety. Professor Terence Stephenson illustrated the scale of the problem in medicine when he stated in his recent evidence to the health select committee "I have personally been investigated twice by the GMC. Doctors recognize hav...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    The impact of complaints procedures on the welfare, health and clinical practise of 7926 doctors in the UK: a cross-sectional survey

    Dear Sir,

    I read this article with great interest and applaud the efforts of the authors to highlight what would seem obvious mental health consequences of such traumatic events as investigations can be for doctors, yet the consequences can be so easily overseen.

    As Psychiatrists we come across individuals in our practice traumatised by various significant life events which have consequences on their...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re:Niall Dickson, Chief Executive of the General Medical Council

    That Mr Dickson's has responded to Bourne's paper is highly significant and possibly the first clear acknowledgement from a senior GMC figure that its processes are associated with stress and anxiety, and that there is "much still for us [the GMC] still to do".

    It seems to me and others that we owe it to all involved in this debate to move forward in a positive way that will both ensure patient safety and carry t...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Niall Dickson, Chief Executive of the General Medical Council

    Anyone who has been the subject of an investigation in any profession will testify to the stress and anxiety that it engenders. This was underlined in the study by Bourne et al in BMJ Open, which looked at the responses from nearly 8000 doctors who had been investigated by various organisations, the vast majority by local NHS bodies.

    Unsurprisingly the study found that among the 374 doctors who responded to the...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    GMC overinvestigation and poor handling of sick doctors

    Dear Authors, Congratulations for the great work. For a long time, doctors have been put in the dock for minor offences, including some non-offences, like illnesses mostly mental health and alcohol etc substance misuse related.

    The procedures applied by the GMC, after a complaint, Interim conditions or suspensions are placed by the panels, which convene upto six times in the first eighteen months period. At the e...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.