Responses

Download PDFPDF

Rates of obstetric intervention and associated perinatal mortality and morbidity among low-risk women giving birth in private and public hospitals in NSW (2000–2008): a linked data population-based cohort study
Compose Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Responses are moderated before posting and publication is at the absolute discretion of BMJ, however they are not peer-reviewed
  • Once published, you will not have the right to remove or edit your response. Removal or editing of responses is at BMJ's absolute discretion
  • If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patient's written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms]
  • By submitting this response you are agreeing to our full [Response terms and requirements]

Vertical Tabs

Other responses

  • Published on:
    If you torture the data enough it will confess.

    Dear Editors

    Dahlen et al have published a paper looking at the rates of intervention and morbidity in low risk women. Two valuable points are made. Firstly that intervention rates in the private system remain higher than those in the public system and secondly, though not a finding of this study, that early term delivery may carry neonatal behavioural consequences which warrant further consideration.

    ...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Reporting bias affects validity of conclusions

    The paper by Dahlen et al has predictably generated a public v private maternity care debate in the Australian media. Unfortunately the data upon which the conclusion of higher morbidity of babies born in private maternity units is compromised by the manner in which the data was collected. Basing the public hospital morbidity data on the NSW Admitted Patient Data Collection (APDC) will inevitably lead to under-reporting o...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Data interpretation is like a salami; you get a different result if you slice it in a different way every time

    Dear Editors

    I wish to formally submit this manuscript as a Letter to the Editors but I found there is no facility to do so under the BMJ Open ScholarOne portal.

    I read with interest the research and conclusion presented by Dahlen et al; their key message that "For low-risk women, care in a private hospital, which includes higher rates of intervention, appears to be associated with higher rates of mor...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.