Article Text

Associations between objectively assessed and self-reported sedentary time with mental health in adults: an analysis of data from the Health Survey for England
  1. Mark Hamer1,
  2. Ngaire Coombs1,
  3. Emmanuel Stamatakis1,2
  1. 1Physical Activity Research Group, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK
  2. 2Prevention Research Collaboration, School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Mark Hamer; m.hamer{at}ucl.ac.uk

Abstract

Objective There is increasing interest in the association between sedentary behaviour and mental health, although most studies have relied solely on self-reported measures, thus making results prone to various biases. The aim was to compare associations between objectively assessed and self-reported sedentary time with mental health in adults.

Setting Community dwelling population sample drawn from the 2008 Health Survey for England.

Participants 11 658 (self-report analysis) and 1947 (objective data) men and women.

Primary outcome The 12-item General Health Questionnaire was administered to assess psychological distress. Sedentary and physical activity (exposure) was objectively measured using accelerometers (Actigraph GT1M) worn around the waist during waking hours for seven consecutive days.

Results The highest tertile of objective sedentary time was associated with higher risk of psychological distress (multivariate adjusted OR=1.74, 95% CI 1.07 to 2.83), as was the highest tertile of self-reported total sitting time (OR=1.34, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.56). Self-reported, but not objective, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was associated with lower risk of psychological distress. Only objective light-intensity activity was associated with lower risk of psychological distress.

Conclusions Sedentary time is associated with adverse mental health.

  • Mental Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health

This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 3.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

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