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Association of work-related stress with mental health problems in a special police force unit
  1. Sergio Garbarino1,2,
  2. Giovanni Cuomo2,
  3. Carlo Chiorri3,
  4. Nicola Magnavita4
  1. 1State Police Health Service Department, Ministry of the Interior, Rome, Italy
  2. 2Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology and Genetics, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy
  3. 3Department of Educational Sciences, Psychology Area, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy
  4. 4Department of Public Health, Occupational Health Unit, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy
  1. Correspondence to Professor Nicola Magnavita; nicolamagnavita{at}gmail.com, nmagnavita{at}rm.unicatt.it

Abstract

Objectives Law and order enforcement tasks may expose special force police officers to significant psychosocial risk factors. The aim of this work is to investigate the relationship between job stress and the presence of mental health symptoms while controlling sociodemographical, occupational and personality variables in special force police officers.

Method At different time points, 292 of 294 members of the ‘VI Reparto Mobile’, a special police force engaged exclusively in the enforcement of law and order, responded to our invitation to complete questionnaires for the assessment of personality traits, work-related stress (using the Demand–Control–Support (DCS) and the Effort–Reward–Imbalance (ERI) models) and mental health problems such as depression, anxiety and burnout.

Results Regression analyses showed that lower levels of support and reward and higher levels of effort and overcommitment were associated with higher levels of mental health symptoms. Psychological screening revealed 21 (7.3%) likely cases of mild depression (Beck Depression Inventory, BDI≥10). Officers who had experienced a discrepancy between work effort and rewards showed a marked increase in the risk of depression (OR 7.89, 95% CI 2.32 to 26.82) when compared with their counterparts who did not perceive themselves to be in a condition of distress.

Conclusions The findings of this study suggest that work-related stress may play a role in the development of mental health problems in police officers. The prevalence of mental health symptoms in the cohort investigated here was low, but not negligible in the case of depression. Since special forces police officers have to perform sensitive tasks for which a healthy psychological functioning is needed, the results of this study suggest that steps should be taken to prevent distress and improve the mental well-being of these workers.

  • Occupational & Industrial Medicine
  • Public Health

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