Responses

Download PDFPDF

Bed sharing when parents do not smoke: is there a risk of SIDS? An individual level analysis of five major case–control studies
Compose Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Responses are moderated before posting and publication is at the absolute discretion of BMJ, however they are not peer-reviewed
  • Once published, you will not have the right to remove or edit your response. Removal or editing of responses is at BMJ's absolute discretion
  • If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patient's written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms]
  • By submitting this response you are agreeing to our full [Response terms and requirements]

Vertical Tabs

Other responses

Jump to comment:

  • Published on:
    A Possible Cause of SIDS is Found in SIDS Data of Carpenter et al., BMJO 2013, Figure 1 and Table 1
    • David T Mage, Health Scientist
    • Other Contributors:
      • E. Maria Donner

    SIDS is characterized and diagnosed by exclusion, especially when expert pediatric pathologists, trained forensic investigators, and learned epidemiologists are unable to find a sufficient cause of infant death at autopsy, at the scene, or in the data, respectively. Therefore the cause of SIDS may be invisible or immeasurable. Furthermore, SIDS is characterized by the fact that in every such case that the parents had no...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Studies cited by authors in their reply do not in fact show routine bed-sharing to be a risk

    In their August 1, 2013 reply to the various responsive letters, the authors characterize as a misunderstanding a previous statement by Vennemann et al. (1) that only non-routine bed sharing is a risk. They say that the two studies cited for that proposition show bed sharing on the last night to be a risk whether or not it is routine. This is incorrect as to both of the studies cited: the 1993 Scragg et al. paper from New...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    The authors' reply leaves unresolved the critical question of primary bed-sharing

    In their August 1, 2013 reply letter, the authors characterize as a misunderstanding the conclusion of a 2012 meta-analysis (1) -- using many of the same databases and with one of the same co-authors as the instant study -- that only non-routine bed-sharing is associated with an increased risk of SIDS. In this way they dismiss a critical limitation of their own study, one which calls fundamentally into question the soundn...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re:Authors' Reply to responses on BMJ Open to Bed sharing when parents do not smoke: Is there a risk of SIDS? An individual level analysis of five major cases-control studies.

    Language in and of itself has no meaning . Only people have meaning. For example:

    Through the Looking Glass, by Lewis Carroll

    'I don't know what you mean by "glory",' Alice said.

    Humpty Dumpty smiled contemptuously. 'Of course you don't --till I tell you. I meant "there's a nice knock-down argument for you!"'

    'But "glory" doesn't mean "a nice knock-down argument",' Alice objected....

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    The validity of Carpenter's arguments from a statistical point of view
    Imputation of missing data
    The REALCOM-IMPUTE imputation method, mentioned in the appendix of the article by Carpenter et al., is based on the assumption that the value of the variable of interest is missing completely at random (MCAR) or that the missing value can be explained by other variables and does not depend on the (unknown) value of the variable of interest itself (MAR, missing at random). Initial an...
    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Authors' Reply to responses on BMJ Open to Bed sharing when parents do not smoke: Is there a risk of SIDS? An individual level analysis of five major cases-control studies.
    • Robert Carpenter, Hon.Professor
    • Other Contributors:
      • McGarvey C, Mitchell EA, Tappin D, Vennemann MM, Smuk M, Carpenter JR.

    Dr. O'Hagan's suggestion that SIDS may be due to maternal vitamin C deficiency seems unlikely because baby formula milk includes vitamin C supplement. We would therefore expect on his hypothesis that bottle fed babies would, if anything, be at lower risk than breast fed infants, which is not the case(1,2).

    Professor Byard and Dr Hunsaker are concerned that the possibility of accidental suffocation was not addres...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    What medical science cannot explain, it can always conveniently choose to disregard
    (1) The stated objective of the study was: To resolve uncertainty as to the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) associated with sleeping in bed with your baby if neither parent smokes and the baby is breastfed. Comment: How about parental poverty and malnutrition? Hypovitaminosis and more specifically maternal vitamin C deficiency have to be considered. Those aspects motivate this response, not alone by drawing attention...
    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    The data in the appendix provide a different perspective

    To the editor,

    I am not a health care professional, but a mother who brought my babies into my bed a couple of decades ago when it appeared that that was the best way for me to get enough rest to be able to care for them. I have read with interest the recent meta-analysis by Carpenter et al. concluding that bed-sharing increases the risk of SIDS even in the case of breast- feeding, non-smoking mothers. [1]

    ...
    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    ARE ALL INFANT DEATHS IN PARENTAL BEDS DUE TO SIDS?

    Roger Byard, Professor of Pathology, The University of Adelaide, SA, Australia; John Hunsaker, Forensic Pathologist, University of Kentucky, Frankfort, Ky, United States.

    Dear Sir,

    We read with interest the recent analysis of five large case-control studies involving sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) with respect to bed sharing [1]. Our concern is that the possibility of accidental suffocation was n...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Concerning conclusions that may negatively impact on safe sleeping, successful breastfeeding, parent wellbeing and open communication between health professionals and parents
    • Catherine M. Fetherston, Associate Professor, School of Health Professions, Murdoch University
    • Other Contributors:
      • Jeanine Young, Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of the Sunshine Coast and Chair, SIDS and Kids National Scientific Advisory Group. Sue Kruske, President, Australian College of Midwives and Director, Queensland Centre fo

    Dear Editor,

    The paper published in your journal by Carpenter et al [1], claims to resolve uncertainties associated with bedsharing and SIDS. We believe however, it does little other than fuel further confusion in the minds of parents and the health professionals charged with providing them with information and support.

    As outlined in other letters the authors chose to use a selection of older studies...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    More questions than answers


    Dear Editor,

    This publication [1] is confusing to parents and physicians because it draws far reaching conclusions from unconvincing data.


    METHODOLOGICAL PROBLEMS

    In our opinion, the validity of this analysis is threatened by selection bias, imputation bias and presentation bias. We think that the conclusions drawn from this study are not generalizable and that many current issues pert...
    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re:Bed sharing when parents do not smoke: is there a risk of SIDS? An individual level analysis of five major case-control studies

    In their paper1 Carpenter et al. conclude that bed-sharing of infants under 3 months with their parents even when the latter did not smoke and had no other risk factors the adjusted odds ratio for SIDS was 5.1 (2.3 to 11.4). This risk was greatly increased when the parents smoked, took alcohol or drugs. These findings are not surprising and confirm that co- sleeping is particularly dangerous for babies under three months of...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re: Bed sharing when parents do not smoke: is there a risk of SIDS?

    Charlotte K Russell - Research Associate, Department of Anthropology, Durham University

    Helen L Ball - Professor of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, Durham University; Director of the Parent-Infant Sleep Lab

    Dear Editor,

    This publication analyses SIDS-risks associated with bed-sharing under different circumstances using data from five historical SIDS studies. Unlike previous analyse...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Inadequate data, too many confounders and a ridiculous analogy!

    I am appalled that this paper managed to get past peer review and reach publication. The authors define 'breastfed' as 'partially or completely breastfeeding at time of death or interview'. This implies there were babies entered into the breastfed group who were receiving formula in quantities that are unknown. What exactly is partially breastfed? Is this one, two, three bottles of formula per day? One breastfeed per da...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    A lack of data and questionable emphasis
    • Peter S. Blair, Senior Research Fellow, University of Bristol
    • Other Contributors:
      • Peter J Fleming (Professor of Infant Health and Developmental Physiology, University of Bristol) and Sue Ashmore (Unicef UK Baby Friendly Initiative)

    Dear Editor,

    The report by Carpenter et al [1] on whether there is a risk of SIDS associated with bed sharing when parents do not smoke fails to meet its stated objective because the data needed to resolve any uncertainty is not available from the studies presented. The over-arching argument is whether bed-sharing in itself poses a risk to infants or whether the risk is within the hazardous circumstances in whi...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.