Article Text

Download PDFPDF

Personality factors predict sleep-related shift work tolerance in different shifts at 2-year follow-up: a prospective study
  1. Sunniva Straume Storemark1,
  2. Ingrid Nesdal Fossum1,
  3. Bjørn Bjorvatn2,3,
  4. Bente Elisabeth Moen2,
  5. Elisabeth Flo2,
  6. Ståle Pallesen1,3
  1. 1Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
  2. 2Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
  3. 3Norwegian Competence Disorder for Sleep Disorders, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway
  1. Correspondence to Sunniva Straume Storemark; sst110{at}student.uib.no

Abstract

Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the personality variables morningness, flexibility, languidity and hardiness could predict sleep-related shift work tolerance for the day, evening and night shifts, respectively.

Design Prospective study design with questionnaires administered in winter 2008/2009 (wave 1) and 2 years later in spring 2011 (wave 3).

Setting Different healthcare institutions in Norway.

Participants The sample comprised in all 700 nurses working a three-shift rotating schedule.

Primary and secondary outcome measures The personality variables were assessed at wave 1, as were the demographic, lifestyle and work-related variables. Sleep-related shift work tolerance, assessed at wave 3, was measured separately for the day, evening and night shifts with the Bergen Shift Work Sleep Questionnaire.

Results Morningness was positively associated with sleep-related day shift tolerance (p<0.001). Flexibility was positively associated with sleep-related tolerance for the evening as well as night shift (p<0.001). Furthermore, languidity was negatively associated with sleep-related shift tolerance for the day, evening and night shifts (p<0.001, <0.01, <0.05, respectively). Hardiness was positively associated with sleep-related tolerance for the day, evening and night shifts (p<0.001, <0.01, <0.05, respectively). Age was negatively associated with sleep-related shift tolerance for the day, night (p<0.01) and evening shifts (p<0.001).

Conclusions The findings indicate that hardiness and languidity predict sleep-related shift work tolerance across all shift types among shift working nurses. The effects of flexibility and morningness seem to depend on the shift schedule. By and large, our results are in accordance with previous studies; however, we have now demonstrated the prospective importance of personality in relation to sleep-related shift work tolerance across different shifts.

  • Occupational & Industrial Medicine
  • Sleep Medicine
  • Mental Health

This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 3.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.