Article Text

Original research
Understanding the traditional values and use of okra among pregnant women in western Ethiopia: a qualitative study
  1. Efrem Negash Kushi1,2,
  2. Tefera Belachew1,
  3. Dessalegn Tamiru1
  1. 1Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
  2. 2Department of Public health, Mettu University, Mettu, Ethiopia
  1. Correspondence to Efrem Negash Kushi; negashefrem96{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Objectives This study explored the traditional values and use of okra among pregnant women, how okra plants are obtained, prepared and used by pregnant women, and the associated beliefs and meanings attached to it in western Ethiopia.

Design Qualitative research.

Setting Rural areas of western Ethiopia.

Participants A purposive sampling technique was used to select a total of 86 pregnant women (14 for in-depth interviews and 72 for focus group discussions) in western Ethiopia.

Results Traditionally okra is used as a source of income and is a common food for guests visiting homes. In line with this, pregnant women in the western part of Ethiopia mainly consumed okra pods. For future consumption and preservation for a long period, they usually transform okra into powder.

Conclusions Other parts of the okra plant rather than pods are not known as a food source and are the most neglected food sources in rural districts of western Ethiopia. The study provides evidence that supports nutritional behavioural change communication interventions on promoting the utilisation of different parts of okra and awareness creation on the nutritional values of okra.

  • nutrition & dietetics
  • nutritional support
  • public health
  • qualitative research
  • nutrition
  • public health

Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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Footnotes

  • Correction notice This article has been corrected since it was published. The title and the affiliation of the corresponding author has been corrected.

  • Contributors ENK investigated the article, performed formal analysis and wrote the original draft, take responsibility of tha manuscript during submission and revision of the manuscript, had access to the data, controlled the decision to publish and is the guarantor. DT conceptualised the data, verified the methods, made substantial contributions to funding acquisition, supervised the article, and reviewed and edited the article. TB conceptualised the data, verified the methods, supervised the article, and reviewed and edited the article.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient and public involvement Patients and/or the public were not involved in the design, or conduct, or reporting, or dissemination plans of this research.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.