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Protocol
Protocol for a Global Burns Research Priority Setting Partnership to agree the most important unanswered questions in international burns care
  1. Hollie Richards1,2,
  2. Robert Staruch3,
  3. Anni King1,2,
  4. Catrin Pugh1,
  5. Suzannah Kinsella4,
  6. Jelena Savović5,6,
  7. Amber Young1,7
  1. 1Centre for Surgical Research, Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
  2. 2National Institute for Health Research Bristol Biomedical Research Centre Surgical Innovation Theme, University Hospitals Bristol and Weston NHS Foundation and the University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
  3. 3Botnar Research Centre, Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
  4. 4James Lind Alliance, National Institute for Health Research, School of Healthcare Enterprise and Innovation, University of Southampton, Alpha House, Enterprise Road, Southampton, UK
  5. 5Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
  6. 6National Institute for Health Research Applied Research Collaboration West at University Hospitals Bristol and Weston NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, UK
  7. 7Children's Burns Research Centre Bristol, University Hospitals Bristol and Weston NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, UK
  1. Correspondence to Hollie Richards; hollie.richards{at}bristol.ac.uk

Abstract

Introduction Burns affect 11 million people globally and can result in long-term disability with substantial associated healthcare costs. There is limited research funding to support trials to provide evidence for clinical decision-making. Research prioritisation ensures that research focuses on the topics most important to stakeholders, addressing issues of research waste and evidence gaps. The aim of this project is to agree the global top 10 research priorities important to international patients, carers and clinicians from all income status countries.

Methods and analysis The Global Burns Research Priority Setting Partnership will use James Lind Alliance methods to establish the top 10 research priorities in global burns care. An initial international online multilingual survey will collect candidate research priorities from stakeholders. To increase equity in participation, the survey will also be available via the social media app WhatsApp. Additionally, interviews will be conducted. Data will be analysed to identify and collate research questions and to verify that the priorities are true clinical uncertainties. This list will then be ranked by stakeholders in order of importance via a second online survey. Finally, a consensus meeting will identify the top 10 research priorities.

Ethics and dissemination The University of Bristol Medical School Faculty Ethical Committee has approved this project. Research into burn care should be prioritised to ensure that funding is focused where most needed. This should be undertaken internationally, to ensure inclusion of the views of professionals and patients from lower income countries, where the incidence of thermal burns is highest. The involvement of the James Lind Alliance will ensure that the methodology is robust and that the patient voice is heard. The final top 10 priorities will be disseminated to funders, governments and researchers internationally to inform future global burns research.

  • SURGERY
  • STATISTICS & RESEARCH METHODS
  • QUALITATIVE RESEARCH
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Footnotes

  • Twitter @HollieSRichards

  • Contributors AY conceived the project and obtained funding; AY, HR and RS worked with the JLA and SK to refine the methodology. AK lead on PPI engagement and contributed to survey dissemination methodology. JS led on systematic review evidence checking strategies. HR drafted the manuscript. JS read and edited the paper and provided expertise in systematic review methodology. CP read and edited the manuscript as a survivor of burn injury representative. All authors read, reviewed and approved the final manuscript.

  • Funding This article presents independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Advanced Research Fellowship NIHR 301362. The study was also supported by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at the University Hospitals Bristol and Weston NHS Foundation Trust and the University of Bristol. JS was supported by the National Institute for Health Research Applied Research Collaboration West (NIHR ARC West) at University Hospitals Bristol and Weston NHS Foundation Trust.

  • Disclaimer The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of the NHS, the NIHR, or the Department of Health and Social Care.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient and public involvement Patients and/or the public were involved in the design, or conduct, or reporting, or dissemination plans of this research. Refer to the Methods section for further details.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.