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Original research
Modifiable psychosocial risk factors and delayed onset of dementia in older populations: analysis of two prospective US cohorts
  1. Francine Grodstein1,2,
  2. Tianhao Wang1,3,
  3. Sue E. Leurgans1,3,
  4. Robert S Wilson1,3,
  5. David A Bennett1,3
  1. 1Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  2. 2Department of Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  3. 3Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Francine Grodstein; Francine_Grodstein{at}rush.edu

Abstract

Objective Preventing Alzheimer’s dementia (AD) fundamentally equates to delaying onset. Thus, we quantified associations of modifiable, psychosocial risk factors to years of delayed onset of dementia.

Design Two prospective cohorts (n=2860) with negative and positive psychosocial factors measured at baseline (depressive symptoms, neuroticism, cognitive activity).

Setting and participants Religious Orders Study of older priests, nuns and brothers across the USA, initiated in 1994; Rush Memory and Aging Project, of older persons in Chicago area, initiated in 1997.

Outcome measure We conducted annual neurological and neuropsychological assessments to identify AD (n=785 incident cases). We compared age at diagnosis of AD across psychosocial risk factor groups, controlling for confounders, using accelerated failure time models.

Results We found strong relations of three or more depressive symptoms with age at AD diagnosis; estimated mean age at diagnosis was 86.9 years with significant symptoms versus 92.1 years with no symptoms (p=0.001). In addition, neuroticism was inversely related to age at AD diagnosis; estimated mean age at diagnosis was 88.8 years for the highest neuroticism tertile and 93.1 years in the lowest tertile (p<0.001). Participants with higher cognitive activity (such as reading books) had later AD diagnosis; estimated mean age at diagnosis was 89.2 years for the lowest cognitive activity group and 92.6 years for the highest activity group (p<0.001).

Conclusions Higher depressive symptoms were associated with 5-year acceleration in AD; higher neuroticism with 4-year acceleration and higher cognitive activity with a 3.5-year delay. To translate findings, prior health services research in the USA indicates delaying dementia 5 years could add 3 years of life and reduce individual costs of care >$60 000. These results provide a rigorous, easily translatable metric for communicating and evaluating the potential public health impact of psychosocial and experiential interventions.

  • dementia
  • public health
  • epidemiology

Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. All data used for this research are available from the Religious Orders Study and Rush Memory and Aging Project and can be requested at https://www.radc.rush.edu.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. All data used for this research are available from the Religious Orders Study and Rush Memory and Aging Project and can be requested at https://www.radc.rush.edu.

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Footnotes

  • Contributors FG, TW, SL, RSW and DAB conceptualised and designed the study. FG and SL contributed to data analysis. FG wrote the first draft of the manuscript. TW conducted the data analysis and visualisation. FG and SL verified the underlying data. SL, RSW and DAB supported the data collection. SL and DAB provided project administration and supervision. TW, SL, RSW and DAB were involved in data interpretation and revision of the manuscript. FG is the guarantor and accepts full responsibility for the work and the conduct of the study, had access to the data and controlled the decision to publish.

  • Funding This study was supported by grants from the National Institute on Aging in the US National Institutes of Health (grant numbers P30AG10161, P30AG72975, R01AG15819, R01AG17917).

  • Disclaimer The funding agency had no role in the study design; in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; and in the decision to submit the article for publication.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient and public involvement Patients and/or the public were involved in the design, or conduct, or reporting, or dissemination plans of this research. Refer to the Methods section for further details.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.