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Protocol
Characterising activity and diet compositions for dementia prevention: protocol for the ACTIVate prospective longitudinal cohort study
  1. Ashleigh E Smith1,
  2. Alexandra T Wade1,
  3. Timothy Olds1,
  4. Dorothea Dumuid1,
  5. Michael J Breakspear2,3,
  6. Kate Laver4,
  7. Mitchell R Goldsworthy5,6,
  8. Michael C Ridding7,
  9. Monica Fabiani8,9,
  10. Jillian Dorrian10,
  11. Montana Hunter11,
  12. Bryan Paton3,
  13. Mahmoud Abdolhoseini11,
  14. Fayeem Aziz11,
  15. Maddison L Mellow1,
  16. Clare Collins12,
  17. Karen J Murphy13,
  18. Gabriele Gratton8,9,
  19. Hannah Keage10,
  20. Ross T Smith14,
  21. Frini Karayanidis11
  1. 1Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), Allied Health and Human Performance, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  2. 2School of Medicine and Public Health, College of Health, Medicine and Wellbeing, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia
  3. 3School of Psychological Sciences, College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia
  4. 4Flinders Health and Medical Research Institute, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  5. 5Lifespan Human Neurophysiology Group, Adelaide Medical School, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  6. 6Hopwood Centre for Neurobiology, Lifelong Health Theme, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute Limited, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  7. 7Allied Health and Human Performance, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  8. 8Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA
  9. 9Psychology Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA
  10. 10Behaviour, Brain and Body Research Centre, Justice and Society, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  11. 11Functional Neuroimaging Laboratory, School of Psychological Sciences, College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia
  12. 12Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition and School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia
  13. 13Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), Clinical and Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  14. 14Wearable Computer Laboratory, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Dr Ashleigh E Smith; ashleigh.smith{at}unisa.edu.au

Abstract

Introduction Approximately 40% of late-life dementia may be prevented by addressing modifiable risk factors, including physical activity and diet. Yet, it is currently unknown how multiple lifestyle factors interact to influence cognition. The ACTIVate Study aims to (1) explore associations between 24-hour time-use and diet compositions with changes in cognition and brain function; and (2) identify duration of time-use behaviours and the dietary compositions to optimise cognition and brain function.

Methods and analysis This 3-year prospective longitudinal cohort study will recruit 448 adults aged 60–70 years across Adelaide and Newcastle, Australia. Time-use data will be collected through wrist-worn activity monitors and the Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adults. Dietary intake will be assessed using the Australian Eating Survey food frequency questionnaire. The primary outcome will be cognitive function, assessed using the Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination-III. Secondary outcomes include structural and functional brain measures using MRI, cerebral arterial pulse measured with diffuse optical tomography, neuroplasticity using simultaneous transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography, and electrophysiological markers of cognitive control using event-related potential and time frequency analyses. Compositional data analysis, testing for interactions between time point and compositions, will assess longitudinal associations between dependent (cognition, brain function) and independent (time-use and diet compositions) variables.

Conclusions The ACTIVate Study will be the first to examine associations between time-use and diet compositions, cognition and brain function. Our findings will inform new avenues for multidomain interventions that may more effectively account for the co-dependence between activity and diet behaviours for dementia prevention.

Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been obtained from the University of South Australia’s Human Research Ethics committee (202639). Findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed manuscripts, conference presentations, targeted media releases and community engagement events.

Trial registration number Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12619001659190).

  • dementia
  • nutrition & dietetics
  • neurophysiology
  • public health
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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Footnotes

  • AES and ATW are joint first authors.

  • Twitter @DrAsh_Smith

  • AES and ATW contributed equally.

  • Contributors AES, FK, MJB, KL, TO, MRG, MCR, DD, MF and JD conceptualised the study. AES, ATW, MH, HK and FK developed the cognitive measures. AES, DD and TO developed the activity measures. ATW, CC and KJM developed the dietary measures. MJB and BP developed the MRI measures. AES, MRG and MLM developed the TMS measures. AES, MRG, MLM, MH, MA, FA and FK developed the EEG measures. MF, GG, MA, FA and FK developed the optical imaging measures. TO, DD and JD developed the statistical approach. AES, KL, DD and RTS will oversee the development of the translation tool. AES and ATW prepared the manuscript. All authors reviewed manuscript drafts and approved the final version.

  • Funding The ACTIVate Study is funded by a National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Boosting Dementia Research Initiative (BDRI) priority round 5 grant (GNT1171313). AES is supported by an NHMRC-ARC Dementia Research Development Fellowship (GNT1097397). DD is supported by an NHMRC Early Career Fellowship (GNT1162166) and the National Heart Foundation of Australia (1020840). MRG is supported by an Australian Research Council (ARC) fellowship (DE200100575). MLM is supported by a Dementia Australia Research Foundation PhD scholarship. CC is supported by an NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship and a University of Newcastle Faculty of Health and Medicine Gladys M Brawn Senior Research Fellowship. HK is supported by an NHMRC Boosting Dementia Research Leadership Fellowship (GNT1135676).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.