Article Text

Original research
How well can we assess the validity of non-randomised studies of medications? A systematic review of assessment tools
  1. Elvira D'Andrea1,
  2. Lydia Vinals2,
  3. Elisabetta Patorno1,
  4. Jessica M. Franklin1,
  5. Dimitri Bennett3,4,
  6. Joan A. Largent5,
  7. Daniela C. Moga6,
  8. Hongbo Yuan7,
  9. Xuerong Wen8,
  10. Andrew R. Zullo9,10,
  11. Thomas P. A. Debray11,12,
  12. Grammati Sarri13
  1. 1Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  2. 2HEOR Department, Cytel Inc, Toronto, Quebec, Canada
  3. 3Pharmacoepidemiology, Takeda Pharmaceutical, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
  4. 4Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA
  5. 5Real-World Solutions, IQVIA, California, Los Angeles, USA
  6. 6Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA
  7. 7Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH), Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  8. 8Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USA
  9. 9Department of Health Services, Policy, and Practice, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
  10. 10Center of Innovation in Long-term Services and Supports, Providence VA Medical Center, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
  11. 11Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht, The Netherlands
  12. 12Smart Data Analysis and Statistics, Utrecht, The Netherlands
  13. 13Real World Evidence Sciences, Visible Analytics Ltd, Oxford, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Thomas P. A. Debray; T.Debray{at}umcutrecht.nl

Abstract

Objective To determine whether assessment tools for non-randomised studies (NRS) address critical elements that influence the validity of NRS findings for comparative safety and effectiveness of medications.

Design Systematic review and Delphi survey.

Data sources We searched PubMed, Embase, Google, bibliographies of reviews and websites of influential organisations from inception to November 2019. In parallel, we conducted a Delphi survey among the International Society for Pharmacoepidemiology Comparative Effectiveness Research Special Interest Group to identify key methodological challenges for NRS of medications. We created a framework consisting of the reported methodological challenges to evaluate the selected NRS tools.

Study selection Checklists or scales assessing NRS.

Data extraction Two reviewers extracted general information and content data related to the prespecified framework.

Results Of 44 tools reviewed, 48% (n=21) assess multiple NRS designs, while other tools specifically addressed case–control (n=12, 27%) or cohort studies (n=11, 25%) only. Response rate to the Delphi survey was 73% (35 out of 48 content experts), and a consensus was reached in only two rounds. Most tools evaluated methods for selecting study participants (n=43, 98%), although only one addressed selection bias due to depletion of susceptibles (2%). Many tools addressed the measurement of exposure and outcome (n=40, 91%), and measurement and control for confounders (n=40, 91%). Most tools have at least one item/question on design-specific sources of bias (n=40, 91%), but only a few investigate reverse causation (n=8, 18%), detection bias (n=4, 9%), time-related bias (n=3, 7%), lack of new-user design (n=2, 5%) or active comparator design (n=0). Few tools address the appropriateness of statistical analyses (n=15, 34%), methods for assessing internal (n=15, 34%) or external validity (n=11, 25%) and statistical uncertainty in the findings (n=21, 48%). None of the reviewed tools investigated all the methodological domains and subdomains.

Conclusions The acknowledgement of major design-specific sources of bias (eg, lack of new-user design, lack of active comparator design, time-related bias, depletion of susceptibles, reverse causation) and statistical assessment of internal and external validity is currently not sufficiently addressed in most of the existing tools. These critical elements should be integrated to systematically investigate the validity of NRS on comparative safety and effectiveness of medications.

Systematic review protocol and registration https://osf.io/es65q.

  • clinical pharmacology
  • statistics & research methods
  • epidemiology
  • public health
  • qualitative research
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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Footnotes

  • Twitter @andrewzullo, @TPA_Debray

  • Contributors ED was involved in substantial contributions to the conception and design, acquisition of data, analysis and interpretation of the data; drafting the article and revising it for intellectual content; and final approval of the version to be published. LV, GS and TD were involved in substantial contributions to the conception and design, acquisition of data, analysis and interpretation of the data; revising the article for intellectual content; and final approval of the version to be published. EP and JF were involved in substantial contributions to the conception and design, analysis and interpretation of the data; revising the article for intellectual content; and final approval of the version to be published. DB, JL, DM, HY, XW and ARZ were involved in substantial contributions to the conception and design, and interpretation of the data; revising the article for intellectual content; and final approval of the version to be published.

  • Funding This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under ReCoDID grant agreement No 825746.

  • Competing interests DB is an employee of Takeda. ARZ has received salary support from Sanofi Pasteur through a grant to Brown University unrelated to the current work. TD provides consulting services via Smart Data Analysis and Statistics. GS discloses being employed by Visible Analytics Ltd.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement All data relevant to the study are included in the article or uploaded as supplemental information.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.