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Original research
Insight in the development of the mutual trust relationship between trainers and trainees in a workplace-based postgraduate medical training programme: a focus group study among trainers and trainees of the Dutch general practice training programme
  1. Linda H.A. Bonnie1,
  2. Mechteld R.M. Visser1,
  3. Anneke W.M. Kramer2,
  4. Nynke van Dijk1
  1. 1Department of General Practice/GP Speciality Training, Amsterdam UMC - Locatie AMC, Amsterdam, North Holland, The Netherlands
  2. 2Department of General Practice/GP Specialty Training, Leiden University, Leiden, South Holland, The Netherlands
  1. Correspondence to Linda H.A. Bonnie; l.h.bonnie{at}amsterdamumc.nl

Abstract

Objectives Trust plays an important role in workplace-based postgraduate medical education programmes. Trainers must trust their trainees for granting them greater independence. Trainees must trust their trainer for a safe learning environment. As trainers’ and trainees’ trust in each other plays an important role in trainee learning and development, the authors aimed to explore the development of the mutual trust relationship between trainers and trainees.

Setting This study was performed in a general practice training department in the Netherlands.

Participants All trainers and trainees of the general practice training department were invited to participate. Fifteen trainers and 34 trainees, voluntarily participated in focus group discussions.

Outcome measures The authors aimed to gain insight in the factors involved in the development of the mutual trust relationship between trainers and trainees, in order to be able to create a model for the development of a mutual trust relationship between trainers and trainees. The risk-based view of trust was adopted as leading conceptual framework.

Results In the first stage of trust development, trainers and trainees develop basic trust in each other. Basic trust forms the foundation of the trust relationship. In the second stage, trainers develop trust in trainees taking into account trainees’ working and learning performance, and the context in which the work is performed. Trainees trust their trainer based on the trainer’savailability and accessibility and the personal relationship between the trainee and their trainer. Trainee self-confidence modifies the development of a trust relationship.

Conclusion The development of a mutual trust relationship between trainers and trainees is a complex process that involves various stages, goals, factors and interactive aspects. As the mutual trust relationship influences the learning environment for trainees, greater emphasis on the mutual trust relationship may improve learning outcomes. Further research may explore the effect of long-term and short-term educational relationships on the trust relationship between trainers and trainees.

  • medical education & training
  • qualitative research
  • primary care
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Footnotes

  • Contributors Author’s contribution LHAB: Substantial contribution to the conception and design of the work, and to the acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data. Substantial contribution in drafting the work. Provides final approval of the version to be published. Agrees to be accountable for all aspects of the work. MRMV: Substantial contribution to the acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data. Substantial contribution in critically revising the work. Provides final approval of the version to be published. Agrees to be accountable for all aspects of the work. AWMK: Substantial contribution to the conception of the work and the interpretation of data. Substantial contribution in critically revising the work. Provides final approval of the version to be published. Agrees to be accountable for all aspects of the work. NvD:Substantial contribution to the conception and design of the work, and to the acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data. Substantial contribution in drafting and critically revising the work. Provides final approval of the version to be published. Agrees to be accountable for all aspects of the work.

  • Funding This publication was written as a part of the project 'The use of Entrustable Professional Activities in Assessment in General Practice Specialty Training' (project number 839130004), that has received fundings from the 'Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development' (ZonMW).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient and public involvement Patients and/or the public were not involved in the design, or conduct, or reporting, or dissemination plans of this research.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Ethics approval This study was approved by the Ethical Review Board of the Netherlands Association for Medical Education (ERB-NVMO, file-number 664).

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement Data are available on reasonable request.

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