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Original research
Food insecurity and its predictors among lactating mothers in North Shoa Zone, Central Ethiopia: a community based cross-sectional study
  1. Lemma Getacher1,
  2. Gudina Egata2,
  3. Yared Asmare Aynalem3,
  4. Abebaw Molla4,
  5. Adane Tesfaye5,
  6. Haimanot Abebe6,
  7. Wubet Alebachew Bayih7,
  8. Samuel Derbie Habtegiorgis8
  1. 1Department of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Institute of Medicine and Health Sciences, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia
  2. 2School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
  3. 3Department of Nursing, College of Health Sciences, Institute of Medicine and Health Sciences, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia
  4. 4Department of Nursing, College of Health Sciences, Institute of Medicine and Health Sciences, Mizan-Tepi University, Mizan, Ethiopia
  5. 5Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Dilla University, Dilla, Ethiopia
  6. 6Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Wolkite University, Wolkite, Ethiopia
  7. 7Department of Pediatrics and Neonatal Nursing, College of Health Sciences, Debre Tabor University, Debre Tabor, Ethiopia
  8. 8Department of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, Ethiopia
  1. Correspondence to Lemma Getacher; lemmagetacher{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Objective To assess the prevalence of food insecurity (FI) and its predictors among lactating mothers in Ataye District, North Shoa Zone, Central Ethiopia.

Design A community-based cross-sectional study design was used.

Setting Two urban and four rural randomly selected kebeles of the Ataye District in Ethiopia.

Participants Out of 635 participants, 612 lactating mothers aged 15–49 years participated from February to April 2018. Mothers who lived for at least 6 months and above in the district were included, and mothers who were not able to respond to an interview were excluded. A single lactating mother per household was included. Lactating mothers in the households were selected using a cluster sampling technique. The number of lactating mothers found in each kebele was taken from family folder documentation.

Primary outcome The prevalence and predictors of food insecurity.

Results The prevalence of FI among lactating mothers was 36.8%. No formal education (adjusted OR (AOR) =1.82, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.92), no income-generating activities (AOR=3.39, 95% CI 2.05 to 5.64), no home gardening practice (AOR=5.65, 95% CI 3.51 to 9.08), alcohol use by husbands (AOR=2.02, 95% CI 1.25 to 3.24), low minimum dietary diversity score (AOR=2.94, 95% CI 1.88 to 4.57), less than three frequencies of meals (AOR=3.97, 95% CI 1.65 to 9.54) and three meals only per day (AOR=1.86, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.17) were significant predictors of FI of mothers.

Conclusion The prevalence of FI was high in the study area. No formal education, no income-generating activities, no home gardening practice, alcohol use by husbands, low minimum dietary diversity score, fewer than three frequencies of meals and three meals only per day were independent predictors of FI. Therefore, increasing home gardening, decreasing alcohol intake, increasing dietary diversity and performing income-generating activities are highly recommended to reduce FI.

  • nutritional support
  • public health
  • public health
  • nutrition
  • nutrition & dietetics
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Footnotes

  • Contributors LG: Participated in the conception and design of the study, performed the data collection, performed the statistical analysis and served as the lead author of the manuscript. GE: Participated in the design of the study, revised subsequent drafts of the paper and contributed to the finalisation of the manuscript. AM, YAA, SD, HA, AT and WAB: Assisted in the design of the study, statistical and intellectual analysis, and revised subsequent drafts of the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Obtained.

  • Ethics approval Ethical approval was obtained from the College of Health and Medical Science Institutional Health Research Ethics Review Committee (IHRERC) of Haramaya University on 15 January 2018 (number Ref C/AC/R/D/897/18).

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement The data sets used and/or analysed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

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