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Factors associated with mental health outcomes across healthcare settings in Oman during COVID-19: frontline versus non-frontline healthcare workers
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  • Published on:
    Factors associated with mental health outcomes across healthcare settings in Oman during COVID-19: frontline versus non-frontline healthcare workers
    • Terrell Bonaby, Nursing Student University of the Bahamas
    • Other Contributors:
      • Terry Campbell, University Nursing Lecturer

    This response is in relation to the article discussing Factors associated with mental health outcomes across healthcare settings in Oman during COVID-19: frontline versus non-frontline healthcare workers, published on October 10, 2020. After reading the article, truly this is an intriguing and very timely article. The results from this indicates that frontline healthcare workers are more likely to experience anxiety, stress and sleep problems as compared with non-frontline healthcare workers. However, the results also presented that both frontline and non-frontline healthcare workers showed no significant differences in depression status. In addition, this study emphasized and seemed to be congruent with other studies in suggesting that the Covid-19 pandemic has increased the rate of depressive symptoms, anxiety and insomnia among healthcare workers. Research studies like Tan, B.Y.Q., Chew, N.W.S, Lee G.K.H., et al. (2020) which also discovered that the primary outcome of the impact of Covid-19 was the prevalence of depression, stress, and anxiety among healthcare workers.
    Furthermore, while being faced with the Covid-19 pandemic, there were various social limitations that were put into place including travel restrictions, quarantine, and curfews etc. These social restrictions and the fear of contracting Covid-19 was very stressful for me as a nursing student. I cannot imagine how this pandemic has impacted the mental health of frontline and non-frontline healthcar...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.