eLetters

664 e-Letters

  • Alicia I. Arbaje

    I read with great interest the article by Woz, et al. on gender as a risk factor for 30 days post-discharge hospital utilisation. The authors state that to their knowledge the issue of gender has not been the focus of studies on post-discharge hospital utilsation. I would like to refer the authors to a nationally representative study of US Medicare data we published in The Gerontologist in 2008 (Arbaje, et al., vol. 48...

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  • Further data available in the Dryad repository
    Richard Sands

    Underlying data from this study is available from the Dryad data repository: http://datadryad.org/resource/doi:10.5061/dryad.f4688

    Krusche A, Cyhlarova E, King S, Williams JMG (2012) Data from: Mindfulness online: a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of a web- based mindfulness course and the impact on stress. Dryad Digital Repository. doi:10.5061/dryad.f4688

    Conflict of Interest:

    ...
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  • Poor oral hygiene may be linked to cancer
    C. Albert Yeung

    There is no doubt that good oral hygiene is important; if dental plaque build up is left for a long time, it can lead to periodontal disease and tooth loss. This long-running cohort study suggests that poor oral hygiene during our 30s is associated with an increased risk of dying of cancer over nearly a quarter of a century.

    This study cannot prove that dental plaque levels either directly or indirectly cause c...

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  • Re:Hypnotics' association with mortality or cancer: bias related to the study design and analysis
    Daniel F. Kripke
    Replying to Dr. Andersen and colleagues, we appreciate their very learned statistical comments on our article. First, there seems to be a misunderstanding of our selection criteria. A patient who developed cancer before receiving a hypnotic would not have been included in either the hypnotic-prescribed or the control group, and therefore would not bias the study in regard to hypnotic-associated cancer incidence. Secondly,...
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  • Re:Is it hypnotics that kill, or is it psychiatric illness?
    Daniel F. Kripke
    In reply to Dr. Terkelsen and colleagues, I am greatly awed by the extensive literature review which they kindly offered with so much effort. Unfortunately, these colleagues ignored the point which we made in our article: Mallon et al. (reference 7) and Belleville (reference 8) have shown that control for depression does not substantially attenuate the mortality hazard associated with hypnotics. On the other hand, Patten e...
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  • Hypnotics' association with mortality or cancer: bias related to the study design and analysis
    Morten Andersen (1)

    In BMJ Open, Kripke et al have presented a study on risks associated with the use of hypnotics (1). In their two-in-one study, the authors report an about fourfold increased risk of death and a 35% increased risk of cancer when comparing users of hypnotics with non-users. The authors present the analyses as a cohort study using a survival analysis model with Cox regression. However, several approaches in both the study d...

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  • Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations may explain the association between dental plaque and cancer mortality
    Wililam B. Grant

    The finding that dental plaque is directly associated with 1.79 times the odds ratio of cancer mortality rates [1] is interesting. However, the conclusion that the bacterial load on tooth surfaces and gingival pockets may play a role in carcinogenesis is most likely incorrect. It is not clear how oral bacteria would cause cancer.

    An alternative explanation for the association is that high dental plaque is a mar...

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  • Is it hypnotics that kill, or is it psychiatric illness?
    Kenneth G Terkelsen, MD

    Is it hypnotics that kill, or is it psychiatric illness? * Kenneth G. Terkelsen, M.D. General Psychiatrist, Assistant Director * James P. McGuire, M.D. Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist Behavioral Health Services Community Health Center of Cape Cod Mashpee, Massachusetts, USA

    * Michael B. Friedman, Adjunct Associate Professor Columbia School of Social Work and Mailman School of Public Health New York, New York, US...

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  • May Systemic Atherosclerotic Risk Classification Bring a Different Glance to the CORONARY Study?
    Sinan Demirtas

    May Systemic Atherosclerotic Risk Classification Bring a Different Glance to the CORONARY Study?

    Running Title; the CORONARY Study and Atherosclerosis Classification ? Sinan DEMIRTAS, Medical School of Dicle University, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery celalyav@hotmail.com Oguz KARAHAN, Medical School of Dicle University, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery oguzk2002@gmail.com ?

    Corresponding Autho...

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  • bias and confounding
    Ingrid Muehlhauser

    There are major concerns related to confounding and bias in this study. More intensive medication in the obese subjects is obviously mainly due to twice as high prevalence rates of hypertension and diabetes compared to subjects with normal BMI. Do the authors suggest that diabetes and hypertension improve life expectancy? Statin use was apparently not different across BMI categories. On the other hand, antidabetic drug t...

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