Article info

PDF

Are sweet snacks more sensitive to price increases than sugar-sweetened beverages: analysis of British food purchase data

Authors

  • Richard D Smith Faculty of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK Behaviour and Health Research Unit, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Laura Cornelsen Faculty of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Diana Quirmbach Faculty of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK Behaviour and Health Research Unit, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Susan A Jebb Behaviour and Health Research Unit, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • Theresa M Marteau Behaviour and Health Research Unit, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  1. Correspondence to Richard D Smith; richard.smith{at}lshtm.ac.uk
View Full Text

Citation

Smith RD, Cornelsen L, Quirmbach D, et al
Are sweet snacks more sensitive to price increases than sugar-sweetened beverages: analysis of British food purchase data

Publication history

  • Received September 26, 2017
  • Revised January 29, 2018
  • Accepted February 5, 2018
  • First published April 26, 2018.

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.