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Talking about human papillomavirus and cancer: development of consultation guides through lay and professional stakeholder coproduction using qualitative, quantitative and secondary data
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  • Published on:
    Response to Vibha Jaiswal, Barriers to real world deployment of HPV consultation guides by ENT surgeons

    On behalf of the authors: We thank Dr Jaiswal for her generous and supportive comments about our article, ‘Talking about human papillomavirus and cancer: development of consultation guides through lay and professional stakeholder coproduction using qualitative, quantitative and secondary data’. We are pleased that reading it prompted her to conduct a rapid assessment of our consultation guides.
    We were delighted to discover the close similarities between the comments expressed by the clinicians in our study and the doctors who took part in Dr Jaiswal’s assessment exercise, and gratified that they found the consultation guides useful and would give the information leaflets to their patients. That the number of doctors fairly or very confident discussing HPV in the context of a Head and Neck consultation rose from 56% to 100% is very encouraging. This further strengthens our confidence in these tools. We would be pleased to receive continuing feedback from clinicians on their use of the guides or the patient information leaflets.
    The main barriers to deployment of the consultation guides in the real world are the practical ones of dissemination and implementation. How can we inform the appropriate clinicians of their existence, and make these resources more easily accessible to them? At present they are available to download; we would like to see them produced as print versions that could be more readily to hand in a consultation. We also believe that the...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Barriers to real world deployment of HPV consultation guides by ENT surgeons
    • Vibha Jaiswal, ENT Speciality Trainee 7 (ENT Surgeon) Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport

    I commend the authors on publishing, and, thank the patients who participated, in this exhaustive study of a difficult topic which covers taboo areas in society. As the authors note, talking about HPV in head and neck cancer is not comfortable for clinicians, with one using the phrase “a can of worms”. Interestingly although most patients were surprised and shocked that HPV caused their cancer, they found the information given in the study context and consultation guides reassuring.

    The one disappointing aspect of the study was the low clinician feedback (47%) on the eventual consultation guides produced (17 out of 36 clinicans responded). Anecdotally there remained concerns amongst the ENT surgeons who had contributed to the study that Head and Neck cancer patients would not want to know or were not interested in the HPV aspect as it was rarely brought up in consultations.

    Therefore I conducted a short and rapid assessment to assess the response to the published consultation guides amongst younger ENT surgeons (core trainee to consultant surgeons working all over Wales.

    Two questionnaires (A) and (B) were completed by ENT surgeons before and after reading the consultation guides (for clinicians and patients) produced by Hendry M et al. BMJ 2017 doi: 10.1136/ bmjopen-2016-015413. Questionnaires A and B asked about respondents’ current practice and confidence in handling such consultations completed before (A) and after (B) reading the leaflets....

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.