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Progression of disease preceding lower extremity amputation in Denmark: a longitudinal registry study of diagnoses, use of medication and healthcare services 14 years prior to amputation
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    Response to the article: Progression of disease preceding lower extremity amputation in Denmark: a longitudinal registry study of diagnoses, use of medication and healthcare services 14 years prior to amputation
    • Megan Amir, Nurse Clinician, Graduate Student McGill University

    Response to the article: Progression of disease preceding lower extremity amputation in Denmark: a longitudinal registry study of diagnoses, use of medication and healthcare services 14 years prior to amputation.

    This article presents an impressive 14 year-long longitudinal study demonstrating the crucial importance of identifying and understanding the progression of lower extremity amputation (LEA)- related diseases. In doing so, health care providers are better prepared to address and potentially eliminate contributing risk factors. As mentioned by the researchers, only a few previous studies have inquired about the progression of diseases and use of health care services related to lower extremity amputations using historical longitudinal data.

    I personally found this article extremely interesting and very well detailed regarding patient demographics, comorbidities, prevalence of prescribed medication, and contacts made to hospitals and general practitioners (GPs). I particularly liked the strong emphasis made on the importance of disease prevention and early symptom recognition in order to treat patients earlier and avert complications.

    What did stand out to me, however, was that a significant portion of the sample had low education in regards to years of schooling. 88% of the sample had less than 9 years of school education which makes me question if educational status played a more significant role in disease progression than what was mentioned...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.