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Lack of an association or an inverse association between low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and mortality in the elderly: a systematic review
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  • Published on:
    Cholesterol levels have negligible correlations with cardiovascular events
    • Reginald Walter Marsh, Biostatistician/epidemiologist Auckland University & The Gillies MacIndoe Research Institute.

    Please see my article with the above name, published in the New Zealand Medical Journal, which used the Caerphilly data. This has not been mentioned elsewhere, presumably because of its obscure site. There was no relationship at all between cholesterol and heart attacks and only 4% of the variance was associated with strokes. NZ Med. J. 2012, 125, 1364.

    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    In Response to Vos and Ravnskov et al.
    • Tiffany A. Eatz, Student
    • Other Contributors:
      • Roger S. Blumenthal, Neil J. Stone, Seth S. Martin

    We would like to thank Vos and Ravnskov et al. for their interest in the points that we raised in our letter to the editor. We welcome scientific exchange, and respect these authors' rights to produce alternate accounts of the veridical world. However, it troubles us that these alternate accounts are in direct conflict with current best evidence.

    For example, Eddie Vos states that there has never been a placeb...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Faulty reporting about mortality regarding women, the elder, and others.

    The Johns Hopkins authors, Eatz et al, critique Ravnskov et al for poor science and methods and then they state this: " Given that statins are known to reduce all-cause mortality .." This ignores the fact that there has NEVER been a placebo controlled cholesterol-lowering intervention that ended with a mortality benefit in women, and this includes statins.

    For example, the land mark 4S study ended with 3 mo...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Scientific flaws in the response by Eatz et al.

    Tiffany Eats et al. claim that atherosclerosis is caused by many other factors than high cholesterol, and we agree. What we claim is that high cholesterol has no influence at all, because, as we have mentioned in our paper, many studies have shown that people with low cholesterol become just as atherosclerotic as people with high cholesterol. Eats et al. therefore demand that global risk assessment must account for other r...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Letter Regarding Critical Flaws in "Lack of an association or an inverse association between low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and mortality in the elderly: a systematic review"
    • Tiffany Eatz, Student
    • Other Contributors:
      • Roger S. Blumenthal, Neil J. Stone, Seth S. Martin

    We write to express our deep concerns about the inappropriate conclusions expressed in the article "Lack of an association or an inverse association between low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and mortality in the elderly: a systematic review"(1). We contend that the article has serious flaws that make its conclusions detrimental to public health and understanding. The article's counterintuitive findings on low-density- li...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Cholesterol on Sunset Boulevard: the decline of a myth

    Cholesterol on Sunset Boulevard: the decline of a myth 1,2Massimo Cocchi, 1Lucio Tonello, 1Fabio Gabrielli 1"Paolo Sotgiu" Institute for Research in Quantitative & Quantum Psychiatry & Cardiology, L.U.de.S. HEI, Via dei Faggi 4, Quartiere La Sguancia, 6912 Lugano-Pazzallo, Switzerland. 2Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, Via Tolara di Sopra, 50, 40064 Ozzano Emilia (Bologna).

    ...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re:Statins do prevent heart attacks and strokes in the elderly

    One of Daniel Kellers arguments is right; association is not the same as causation. However, an inverse association is one of the strongest arguments against causation. Furthermore, we have not written that statin treatment is useless, but that its effect is minuscule. Keller has used a meta-analysis of statin trials in old people as an argument, but to claim that the risk of myocardial infarction was lowered by 39.4% and...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Statins do prevent heart attacks and strokes in the elderly

    Ravnskov and colleagues conclude that their analysis of observational data requires "re-evaluation of guidelines recommending pharmacological reduction of LDL-C in the elderly as a component of cardiovascular disease prevention strategies." [1] I disagree, because the guidelines they challenge were based on large, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded prospective interventional trials, higher-quality studies yieldi...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Two opposite interpretations of data about cholesterol, CVD; but good theories of why are missing

    Two opposite views: is (or is not) elevated levels of total cholesterol (TC) a primary cause of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD)? If not, what is the primary cause of acquired CVD, how does it relate to cholesterol?

    Goldstein and Brown propose that LDL-C is the essential causative agent of CVD. Ravnskov and his collaborators disagree; they proposed several empirical descriptions of what causes CV...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.