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Factors related to prolonged on-scene time during ambulance transportation for critical emergency patients in a big city in Japan: a population-based observational study
  1. Isao Nagata1,2,3,
  2. Toshikazu Abe4,5,
  3. Yoshinori Nakata3,
  4. Nanako Tamiya5
  1. 1Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Majors of Medical Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
  2. 2Department of Critical Care Medicine, Yokohama City Minato Red Cross Hospital, Yokohama, Japan
  3. 3Graduate School of Public Health, Teikyo University, Tokyo, Japan
  4. 4Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, Tsukuba, Japan
  5. 5Department of Health Services Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
  1. Correspondence to Dr Toshikazu Abe; abetoshi111{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Objectives We aimed to investigate the factors related to prolonged on-scene times, which were defined as being over 30 min, during ambulance transportation for critical emergency patients in the context of a large Japanese city.

Design A population-based observational study.

Setting Kawasaki City, Japan's eighth largest city.

Participants The participants in this study were all critical patients (age ≥15 years) who were transported by ambulance between April 2010 and March 2013 (N=11 585).

Outcome measures On-scene time during ambulance transportation for critical emergency patients.

Results The median on-scene time for all patients was 17 min (IQR 13–23). There was a strong correlation between on-scene time and the number of phone calls to hospitals from emergency medical service (EMS) personnel (p<0.001). In multivariable logistic regression, the number of phone calls to hospitals from EMS personnel, intoxication, minor disease and geographical area were associated with on-scene times over 30 min. Age, gender, day of the week and time of the day were not associated with on-scene times over 30 min.

Conclusions To make on-scene time shorter, it is vital to redesign our emergency system and important to develop a system that accommodates critical patients with intoxication and minor disease, and furthermore to reduce the number of phone calls to hospitals from EMS personnel.

  • ACCIDENT & EMERGENCY MEDICINE
  • HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION & MANAGEMENT
  • PUBLIC HEALTH

This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

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