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039: BIRTH PREPAREDNESS, COMPLICATION READINESS AND ASSOCIATED FACTORS AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN ATTENDING ANTENATAL CLINICS AT MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH (MOH) AREA PADUKKA
  1. Chithramali H Rodrigo1,
  2. Vindya Kumarapeli2
  1. 1Ministry of Health, Epidemiology Unit, Colombo, Padukka, Sri Lanka
  2. 2Ministry of Health, National Institute of Mental Health, Angoda, Colombo, Sri Lanka

Abstract

Background Obstetric emergencies need prior preparation. ‘Birth Preparedness and Complication Readiness' (BPCR) is a concept that promotes timely maternal care.

Objectives This study assessed BPCR and associated factors among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics (ANCs) in MOH area Padukka.

Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in 2014, among a random sample of 280 third trimester pregnant women, attending ANCs in MOH area Padukka. Data were collected using a pre-tested interviewer administered questionnaire. Satisfactory BPCR was if accomplished ≥6 components of 8; desired place of birth, closest care facility, birth-related expenses, emergency expenses, person to accompany, arrangements to look after other children, transport for birth, transport in an obstetric emergency.

Result Response rate was 95.9% (n=269). Median age was 29 years (IQR; 25–32). Pregnancy was planned by 84.0% (n=226), 81.0% (n=218) had registered with PHM ≤8 weeks, 58.4% (n=157) had attended ≥5 ANCs, 10.8% (n=29) had attended all ante-natal classes, 75.8% (n=204) had discussed BPCR plan with healthcare provider. Only 60.2% (n=162) had satisfactory knowledge on pregnancy, delivery and post-partum danger signs, 75.0% (n=207) had favourable attitudes towards BPCR, 68.6% (n=185) had favourable perceptions on BPCR services. Of them 86.2% (n=232) had satisfactory BPCR which was significantly associated with planned pregnancy, registration ≤8 weeks, ≥5 ANCs, ≥1 antenatal classes, discussing BPCR plan with healthcare provider, knowledge on pregnancy and post-partum danger signs, favourable attitudes and favourable perceptions (p<0.05).

Conclusion Knowledge on danger signs and attitudes towards BPCR need improvement. Sustainable, culturally sensitive BPCR practice models are needed.

  • SURGERY

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